OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6801 by jester » Fri Aug 28, 2020 2:08 pm

Yeah, I still don't see that as being an actual problem with the markets themselves. If we have super successful companies, the stocks should reflect that. We can get into monopolistic practices, etc. as something to be mindful of, but particularly in tech there is very real value to monopoly tech ecosystems (unfortunately). So, it's tough.

The real problem is the societal/cultural response to the market and its position on public/personal finance. Some of that is a regulatory matter (e.g., try and avoid the housing market crash due to idiot behavior), but it's also much deeper than that in some circles. The conservative desire to eliminate/privatize social security is gobsmackingly stupid, for example, and derives almost entirely from a completely different relationship to the market than the average American. The result is this discourse that acts like the market going up is great for everyone and fixes all problems, but the reality is that only a modest percentage of the population actually benefits directly.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6802 by JLHockeyKnight » Fri Aug 28, 2020 7:46 pm

Hovercraft wrote:
JLHockeyKnight wrote:Right. I factor that in to my gains when I say I'm going to sell at 10-15% gains. I figure if I gain 10% lose 22% to taxes that's like 8% gains (spitballing it) which is still way better than the 0.8% interest in my high yield savings account because the market is still trying to recover from the COVID tank.



You don't have tax free savings accounts down there I guess? We can have like 50k in an tax sheltered investment account, and limit goes up by 5k per year. My whole TFSA is up over 12% since inception mostly on the back of US Index fund I'm in which is up like 35%. I'm not near the max amount though so gains are still small scale.


As Jester chimed into. My retirement is tax free, but the stocks I talk about here are a portion of my savings. So yeah, any gains are taxed just like income.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6803 by Craig » Fri Aug 28, 2020 7:54 pm

That's different than a TFSA. We have RRSPs, which are long term savings accounts that you pay into with pre-tax dollars, which lowers your tax burden at the end of the year. Withdrawing from them before retirement has steep penalties, and counts as income whenever you do withdraw.

TFSAs are paid into with after tax dollars, so paying in doesn't help your taxes that year. When you withdraw, it doesn't count as income though, so you end up with roughly the same benefit. You can withdraw from your TFSA whenever you want without penalty.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6804 by FlyHigh » Tue Sep 08, 2020 11:34 am

Last couple days have been very instructive re: run-up in tech stocks. Seems like at least a chunk of it was SoftBank fueled. But the fact that 4-5 companies in the same sector can swing the market like this is....interesting.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6805 by Konecny HypeTrain Captain » Tue Sep 08, 2020 5:21 pm

Going back to work tomorrow, I work in fine dining can't lie to anybody it's stressing me out. Talking to all my friends in the industry as well be careful if you guys go out to eat indoors. None of us trust any of our management teams to properly follow protocol and safety procedures considering they never did it on a regular basis. We all feel like it's a matter of IF not when that we all get the virus. I really don't trust staff and managers wiping down booths/chairs/tables consistently
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6806 by jester » Wed Sep 09, 2020 9:23 am

Konecny HypeTrain Captain wrote:Going back to work tomorrow, I work in fine dining can't lie to anybody it's stressing me out. Talking to all my friends in the industry as well be careful if you guys go out to eat indoors. None of us trust any of our management teams to properly follow protocol and safety procedures considering they never did it on a regular basis. We all feel like it's a matter of IF not when that we all get the virus. I really don't trust staff and managers wiping down booths/chairs/tables consistently


Be safe, man. Restaurants/bars -- particularly once it gets cold and outside isn't an option -- are like standing on the roof at Chernobyl.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6807 by FlyHigh » Wed Sep 09, 2020 2:00 pm

Best of luck and hope you can stay safe, hope that customers observe the protocols as well.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6808 by JLHockeyKnight » Wed Sep 09, 2020 2:20 pm

Konecny HypeTrain Captain wrote:Going back to work tomorrow, I work in fine dining can't lie to anybody it's stressing me out. Talking to all my friends in the industry as well be careful if you guys go out to eat indoors. None of us trust any of our management teams to properly follow protocol and safety procedures considering they never did it on a regular basis. We all feel like it's a matter of IF not when that we all get the virus. I really don't trust staff and managers wiping down booths/chairs/tables consistently


Stay safe man.

If it makes you feel better, I'm still concerned about eating indoors, and I'm sure I'm not the only one. So I'd expect a good percentage of people are going to try to keep eating outdoors as long as possible. Shit, I'm not even going to places to eat outdoors. Takeout only. Same reasons you said: I don't trust every place will be wiping things down before I arrive
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6809 by Konecny HypeTrain Captain » Thu Sep 10, 2020 12:42 am

After my first shift back, I urge you all to not eat indoors just grab take out if you really want the food from the restaurant. I'm doing all I can but coworkers, guests and managers aren't and that's scary. It's making me strongly reconsider wanting to be in this business at the moment even though I love it. It's absolutely like standing on the roof of Chernobyl right now, it's even more amazing that people still don't believe Covid is serious with close to 200k dead and counting. Then from a purely service stand point it's just very weird. I enjoy talking to my guests and getting to know a little bit about them (if that's what they want of course I'll never force a convo on somebody who wants a quiet dinner) right now it's basically impossible, feel like it's shit service and it's out of my hands. I'm actually surprised at how many people just don't care and really want to eat indoors at any cost. Got a few "Man you must be so excited to be back were so happy for you!" I really hope it doesn't come to this, but I think nothing will matter until more employees of restaurants themselves die from Covid which I already know a few cases. I have a good shot of beating it I would think, but so of my coworkers would be lucky to survive. Alright that's all for my post work mini rant thank you all for tuning in.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6810 by Hovercraft » Thu Sep 10, 2020 6:47 am

Stay safe man, that sounds so rough to handle. I really feel for you guys and how bad it is down there. Trump was recorded admitting he downplayed the threat in February. Pretty much admitting he intentionally let more Americans die. And somehow 45% of voters will still vote for him...
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6811 by Rogers Pancreas » Thu Sep 10, 2020 1:33 pm

On the plus side, that figure was probably closer to 51% before COVID hit.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6812 by Craig » Thu Sep 10, 2020 1:55 pm

Not really, his approval rating isn't actually changed much since COVID. He actually peaked at 45.8% approval rating in March/April during COVID, an all-time high. He's since fallen back to his normal 40-43% range. His approval rating hardly ever changes, regardless of what he does.

https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/tr ... l-ratings/
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6813 by jester » Thu Sep 10, 2020 2:06 pm

Hovercraft wrote:Stay safe man, that sounds so rough to handle. I really feel for you guys and how bad it is down there. Trump was recorded admitting he downplayed the threat in February. Pretty much admitting he intentionally let more Americans die. And somehow 45% of voters will still vote for him...


Partisanship is a hell of a drug.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6814 by jester » Thu Sep 10, 2020 2:09 pm

Craig wrote:Not really, his approval rating isn't actually changed much since COVID. He actually peaked at 45.8% approval rating in March/April during COVID, an all-time high. He's since fallen back to his normal 40-43% range. His approval rating hardly ever changes, regardless of what he does.

https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/tr ... l-ratings/


This is nevertheless notable, however, as many world leaders (and governors in the US) have seen their approvals jump considerably due to their management of the pandemic. On Earth 2, where Trump doesn't act like a narcissistic sociopath, the pandemic may have assured his reelection.

Hell, Cuomo didn't even handle the pandemic all that well and he's still seen a considerable bump because it was clear he was actually trying to do something positive.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6815 by Craig » Thu Sep 10, 2020 2:12 pm

jester wrote:
Hovercraft wrote:Stay safe man, that sounds so rough to handle. I really feel for you guys and how bad it is down there. Trump was recorded admitting he downplayed the threat in February. Pretty much admitting he intentionally let more Americans die. And somehow 45% of voters will still vote for him...


Partisanship is a hell of a drug.


Early on, when people realized how awful and incompetent he was and he was doing stuff like randomly trying to ban immigrants from specific countries, his approval rating dropped into the high 30s. It took a month or two for people to rationalize it away and he's been back in that 40-45% range ever since. Getting impeached, kids in cages, lawsuits, covfefe, passing tax reform, basically nothing can move him up or down. It's truly incredible.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6816 by jester » Thu Sep 10, 2020 2:18 pm

Craig wrote:
jester wrote:
Hovercraft wrote:Stay safe man, that sounds so rough to handle. I really feel for you guys and how bad it is down there. Trump was recorded admitting he downplayed the threat in February. Pretty much admitting he intentionally let more Americans die. And somehow 45% of voters will still vote for him...


Partisanship is a hell of a drug.


Early on, when people realized how awful and incompetent he was and he was doing stuff like randomly trying to ban immigrants from specific countries, his approval rating dropped into the high 30s. It took a month or two for people to rationalize it away and he's been back in that 40-45% range ever since. Getting impeached, kids in cages, lawsuits, covfefe, passing tax reform, basically nothing can move him up or down. It's truly incredible.


We're in a period of peak polarization, for sure. There are a lot of contributing factors to that, not the least of which is the heavy influence of cable news and radio on conservative voters (not to mention their social media habits). It will be interesting to see what happens in the coming decades as the vastly divergent politics of millenials and downward begin to have more impact.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6817 by Craig » Thu Sep 10, 2020 2:28 pm

jester wrote:
Craig wrote:
jester wrote:
Partisanship is a hell of a drug.


Early on, when people realized how awful and incompetent he was and he was doing stuff like randomly trying to ban immigrants from specific countries, his approval rating dropped into the high 30s. It took a month or two for people to rationalize it away and he's been back in that 40-45% range ever since. Getting impeached, kids in cages, lawsuits, covfefe, passing tax reform, basically nothing can move him up or down. It's truly incredible.


We're in a period of peak polarization, for sure. There are a lot of contributing factors to that, not the least of which is the heavy influence of cable news and radio on conservative voters (not to mention their social media habits). It will be interesting to see what happens in the coming decades as the vastly divergent politics of millenials and downward begin to have more impact.


People probably said similar things about the hippies when they were young. Now we just call 'em boomers.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6818 by jester » Thu Sep 10, 2020 2:38 pm

Craig wrote:
jester wrote:
Craig wrote:
Early on, when people realized how awful and incompetent he was and he was doing stuff like randomly trying to ban immigrants from specific countries, his approval rating dropped into the high 30s. It took a month or two for people to rationalize it away and he's been back in that 40-45% range ever since. Getting impeached, kids in cages, lawsuits, covfefe, passing tax reform, basically nothing can move him up or down. It's truly incredible.


We're in a period of peak polarization, for sure. There are a lot of contributing factors to that, not the least of which is the heavy influence of cable news and radio on conservative voters (not to mention their social media habits). It will be interesting to see what happens in the coming decades as the vastly divergent politics of millenials and downward begin to have more impact.


People probably said similar things about the hippies when they were young. Now we just call 'em boomers.


Well, sure, but a lot of shit happened between the 60s and today. Collapse of the last vestiges of the New Deal Dems, geographic coalition transformations following the Civil Rights era, the long vestigial tale of Vietnam on Boomer politics (likely to be a 9/11, Global War of Terror effect on current generations) ... and, not for nothing, the emergence of cable news that conservative boomers have bought into so fully that has pretty tremendous epistemic impact on politics.

Some of that will likely hold, but there are some pretty substantive shifts that occur in terms of political ideology as you move from the 45+ crowd, to the younger generations. Specifically, a lot of the cultural battlefields that so marked the 70s, 80s, 90s, 00s, and 10s, are way less salient with those generations -- e.g., gay marriage. Additionally, there are some pretty big shifts on views with regard to drugs and so forth. Basically, I think you're looking at a conservative ideological spectrum/coalition that will lean towards more of a libertarian position (particularly on cultural issues -- important to not include abortion in this, that hasn't really moved in polling). On the liberal side of the spectrum, Bernie isn't some random occurrence. There's a hunger for more progressive politics, and a more progressive liberal party.

This can obviously lead to a similarly polarized political dynamic, but I wouldn't be shocked to see things become a bit more in flux at some point here as politicians struggle to find the right messaging to win with younger voters.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6819 by Rogers Pancreas » Thu Sep 10, 2020 2:49 pm

Craig wrote:Not really, his approval rating isn't actually changed much since COVID. He actually peaked at 45.8% approval rating in March/April during COVID, an all-time high. He's since fallen back to his normal 40-43% range. His approval rating hardly ever changes, regardless of what he does.

https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/tr ... l-ratings/

It was a tongue-in-cheek comment, CRAIG.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2 ... ronavirus/
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6820 by Craig » Thu Sep 10, 2020 2:52 pm

Yeah but it wasn't accurate though. My hands were tied.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6821 by Craig » Thu Sep 10, 2020 2:55 pm

jester wrote:
Craig wrote:
jester wrote:
We're in a period of peak polarization, for sure. There are a lot of contributing factors to that, not the least of which is the heavy influence of cable news and radio on conservative voters (not to mention their social media habits). It will be interesting to see what happens in the coming decades as the vastly divergent politics of millenials and downward begin to have more impact.


People probably said similar things about the hippies when they were young. Now we just call 'em boomers.


Well, sure, but a lot of shit happened between the 60s and today. Collapse of the last vestiges of the New Deal Dems, geographic coalition transformations following the Civil Rights era, the long vestigial tale of Vietnam on Boomer politics (likely to be a 9/11, Global War of Terror effect on current generations) ... and, not for nothing, the emergence of cable news that conservative boomers have bought into so fully that has pretty tremendous epistemic impact on politics.

Some of that will likely hold, but there are some pretty substantive shifts that occur in terms of political ideology as you move from the 45+ crowd, to the younger generations. Specifically, a lot of the cultural battlefields that so marked the 70s, 80s, 90s, 00s, and 10s, are way less salient with those generations -- e.g., gay marriage. Additionally, there are some pretty big shifts on views with regard to drugs and so forth. Basically, I think you're looking at a conservative ideological spectrum/coalition that will lean towards more of a libertarian position (particularly on cultural issues -- important to not include abortion in this, that hasn't really moved in polling). On the liberal side of the spectrum, Bernie isn't some random occurrence. There's a hunger for more progressive politics, and a more progressive liberal party.

This can obviously lead to a similarly polarized political dynamic, but I wouldn't be shocked to see things become a bit more in flux at some point here as politicians struggle to find the right messaging to win with younger voters.


For sure, it will be interesting to see how it plays out. I just meant we don't really see Boomers advocating for peace and free love anymore, you know? But unquestionably they have moved the political centre on many issues. As millennials get older and richer, I kinda expect their enthusiasm for things like defunding police and UBI will fade a bit.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6822 by jester » Thu Sep 10, 2020 3:56 pm

Craig wrote:For sure, it will be interesting to see how it plays out. I just meant we don't really see Boomers advocating for peace and free love anymore, you know? But unquestionably they have moved the political centre on many issues. As millennials get older and richer, I kinda expect their enthusiasm for things like defunding police and UBI will fade a bit.


To an extent, but a couple things are also true. Political partisanship is really sticky -- i.e., if you vote Dem/GOP when you're 20, you're likely a leaner in that direction the rest of your life. This is bad news for the GOP. Additionally, younger voters are not showing much movement ideologically right now -- e.g., millenials aren't getting more conservative as they buy houses.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6823 by Craig » Thu Sep 10, 2020 4:11 pm

Is political affiliation more sticky now than it used to be? I doubt most boomers were voting Nixon in their 20s. I get the impression people tend to skew conservative as they age. Someone must have studied this in detail.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6824 by jester » Thu Sep 10, 2020 4:30 pm

Craig wrote:Is political affiliation more sticky now than it used to be? I doubt most boomers were voting Nixon in their 20s. I get the impression people tend to skew conservative as they age. Someone must have studied this in detail.


Hard to say, but I think you're missing a key component of Boomer voting patterns. Dems started the Vietnam War. So, yes, a lot of Boomers voted for Nixon (who positioned himself as an anti-war candidate!). You also have a pretty good contingent of older voters that came of age during the Reagan era (the block of 50-64 year olds are Trump's strongest age group). On top of that, Carter's administration was widely considered a failure, and Dem policies more broadly were viewed as failing in the 70s and 80s prior to the emergence of Clinton and the Dem shift towards more center-left politics (Clinton has huge influence on young Gen Xers and older millenials in terms of partisanship patterns).
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6825 by CantSeeColors » Fri Sep 11, 2020 1:55 pm

jester wrote:
Craig wrote:For sure, it will be interesting to see how it plays out. I just meant we don't really see Boomers advocating for peace and free love anymore, you know? But unquestionably they have moved the political centre on many issues. As millennials get older and richer, I kinda expect their enthusiasm for things like defunding police and UBI will fade a bit.


To an extent, but a couple things are also true. Political partisanship is really sticky -- i.e., if you vote Dem/GOP when you're 20, you're likely a leaner in that direction the rest of your life. This is bad news for the GOP. Additionally, younger voters are not showing much movement ideologically right now -- e.g., millenials aren't getting more conservative as they buy houses.

This is obviously anecdotal, but I'm an old millennial (born in 85) who owns a house now and (not to brag) have a well above average income, and if anything, I've gotten more liberal as I've aged. To me, an important thing is economic conservatism vs. social conservatism. I can't even start to care about the economic issues until the GOP stops being explicitly racist, sexist, etc., and I think that's probably true of a large chunk of my cohort. It also "helps" that I've been so burdened with student loans that I still don't get to keep a lot of my money, so what the hell do I care about taxes?
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6826 by jester » Fri Sep 11, 2020 3:47 pm

CantSeeColors wrote:
jester wrote:
Craig wrote:For sure, it will be interesting to see how it plays out. I just meant we don't really see Boomers advocating for peace and free love anymore, you know? But unquestionably they have moved the political centre on many issues. As millennials get older and richer, I kinda expect their enthusiasm for things like defunding police and UBI will fade a bit.


To an extent, but a couple things are also true. Political partisanship is really sticky -- i.e., if you vote Dem/GOP when you're 20, you're likely a leaner in that direction the rest of your life. This is bad news for the GOP. Additionally, younger voters are not showing much movement ideologically right now -- e.g., millenials aren't getting more conservative as they buy houses.

This is obviously anecdotal, but I'm an old millennial (born in 85) who owns a house now and (not to brag) have a well above average income, and if anything, I've gotten more liberal as I've aged. To me, an important thing is economic conservatism vs. social conservatism. I can't even start to care about the economic issues until the GOP stops being explicitly racist, sexist, etc., and I think that's probably true of a large chunk of my cohort. It also "helps" that I've been so burdened with student loans that I still don't get to keep a lot of my money, so what the hell do I care about taxes?


And data backs up how sticky this stuff is, so you're more of an example (so am I) of the phenomenon than simply an anecdote. GOP has seriously torched itself with pretty much everyone that wasn't old enough to vote for Reagan/Bush.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6827 by Hovercraft » Fri Sep 11, 2020 4:28 pm

GOP aren't even fiscally conservative, they just pretend to be
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6828 by jester » Fri Sep 11, 2020 4:46 pm

Hovercraft wrote:GOP aren't even fiscally conservative, they just pretend to be


Oh, they're about to get fiscally conservative again.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6829 by CantSeeColors » Sat Sep 12, 2020 3:45 pm

jester wrote:
Hovercraft wrote:GOP aren't even fiscally conservative, they just pretend to be


Oh, they're about to get fiscally conservative again.

We can only hope
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6830 by jester » Sat Sep 12, 2020 4:54 pm

CantSeeColors wrote:
jester wrote:
Hovercraft wrote:GOP aren't even fiscally conservative, they just pretend to be


Oh, they're about to get fiscally conservative again.

We can only hope


Not really. They strangle government when Dems are in power, then spend/tax idiotically when they're in power. It isn't new.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6831 by Craig » Sat Sep 12, 2020 4:57 pm

Yeah, I think he meant we can only hope the Dems take power.
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6832 by Rogers Pancreas » Sat Sep 12, 2020 6:36 pm

CantSeeColors wrote:
jester wrote:
Craig wrote:For sure, it will be interesting to see how it plays out. I just meant we don't really see Boomers advocating for peace and free love anymore, you know? But unquestionably they have moved the political centre on many issues. As millennials get older and richer, I kinda expect their enthusiasm for things like defunding police and UBI will fade a bit.


To an extent, but a couple things are also true. Political partisanship is really sticky -- i.e., if you vote Dem/GOP when you're 20, you're likely a leaner in that direction the rest of your life. This is bad news for the GOP. Additionally, younger voters are not showing much movement ideologically right now -- e.g., millenials aren't getting more conservative as they buy houses.

This is obviously anecdotal, but I'm an old millennial (born in 85) who owns a house now and (not to brag) have a well above average income, and if anything, I've gotten more liberal as I've aged. To me, an important thing is economic conservatism vs. social conservatism. I can't even start to care about the economic issues until the GOP stops being explicitly racist, sexist, etc., and I think that's probably true of a large chunk of my cohort. It also "helps" that I've been so burdened with student loans that I still don't get to keep a lot of my money, so what the hell do I care about taxes?

I've said it before and I'll say it again: I consider myself socially progressive and fiscally conservative, in that order. My wife is the same way.
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CantSeeColors
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6833 by CantSeeColors » Sun Sep 13, 2020 10:27 am

Rogers Pancreas wrote:
CantSeeColors wrote:
jester wrote:
To an extent, but a couple things are also true. Political partisanship is really sticky -- i.e., if you vote Dem/GOP when you're 20, you're likely a leaner in that direction the rest of your life. This is bad news for the GOP. Additionally, younger voters are not showing much movement ideologically right now -- e.g., millenials aren't getting more conservative as they buy houses.

This is obviously anecdotal, but I'm an old millennial (born in 85) who owns a house now and (not to brag) have a well above average income, and if anything, I've gotten more liberal as I've aged. To me, an important thing is economic conservatism vs. social conservatism. I can't even start to care about the economic issues until the GOP stops being explicitly racist, sexist, etc., and I think that's probably true of a large chunk of my cohort. It also "helps" that I've been so burdened with student loans that I still don't get to keep a lot of my money, so what the hell do I care about taxes?

I've said it before and I'll say it again: I consider myself socially progressive and fiscally conservative, in that order. My wife is the same way.

My hope is that enough people under 45 or so put the social issues first that we can get to a place where social progressivism in politics is a given for both sides and we can just debate the economic issues
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Re: OT Thread, NOT Obsequious 2

Post #6834 by jester » Mon Sep 14, 2020 12:22 pm

Rogers Pancreas wrote:I've said it before and I'll say it again: I consider myself socially progressive and fiscally conservative, in that order. My wife is the same way.


CantSeeColors wrote:My hope is that enough people under 45 or so put the social issues first that we can get to a place where social progressivism in politics is a given for both sides and we can just debate the economic issues


I do not think that is uncommon for our age cohort on down. There are tensions with the premise, however, as a lot of socially progressive views (particularly related to class/economics) are ... not fiscally cheap. That said, there is pretty obviously a rational pathway of fiscal responsibility that is both socially progressive and mindful of the bottom line. One of the key structural problem right now is that only one party is actually fiscally rational. One can debate Dem policy objectives, but at least their overall approach to policy is economically literate. GOP wants to slash taxes, keep spending static, and then watch the magic happen of savings -- yes, some want to gut a lot of spending programs, but they do not and never have had the votes or support to do that.

One thing to keep in mind -- and something there is no small amount of research into -- is that progressive policies that are put in place that have real meaning in people's lives (e.g., healthcare) have a tendency to lead to further social problems. This is one of the key stories in Europe, where a strong social safety net is in place, but that safety net was largely put in by racially and culturally homogeneous societies following WWII. As Europe has grown more diverse, it has led to a host of problems with in groups (i.e., White Europeans) getting pissed at the notion of out groups (i.e., immigrants) having access to government services. So ... the gears continue to grind. (This is something that Bernie and his crew never really addressed with any seriousness.)

The other area to pay real close attention to along generational lines is in the area of international relations and foreign policy. With the demise of the WWII generations happening quickly, and Boomers beginning to fade off with the scars of Vietnam, we are entering a new era of US domestic views in this arena. Obviously, it is going to be one for good or bad heavily defined by 9/11 and the GWoT, but the appeal of Trump's foreign policy outlook to many on the right and Bernie's appeal to many on the left signals that we are entering a potentially dynamic environment in which naivete may have much more sway over foreign policy than anyone is going to like. Of note, this is true in Europe as well, where the centrist politicians that dominated Europe since WWII have either been swept away or are holding on by a thread, and the simmering remnants of far right and left elements seem to be gaining a bit more footing.

At least the world isn't burning, though ...

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