anarchy 1.0 - Kriegsanstifter

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anarchy 1.0 - Kriegsanstifter

Post #1 by LeafOfBread » Tue Nov 22, 2016 1:31 pm

keep this shit out of hockey threads
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #2 by paulster » Tue Nov 22, 2016 1:37 pm

Liberal scum.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #3 by Thomas Malthus » Tue Nov 22, 2016 1:54 pm

What's wrong, LOB, can't handle the bright sunny ways in your eyes?
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #4 by akiberg » Tue Nov 22, 2016 2:15 pm

LeafOfBread wrote:keep this shit out of hockey threads

I will acquiesce if the sunny ways crowd also limit their political thought to this fred as well.
“No country would find 173 billion barrels of oil in the ground and just leave them there.”
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #5 by akiberg » Tue Nov 22, 2016 2:25 pm

http://www.macleans.ca/economy/realesta ... ng-bubble/

oil, manufacturing and housing. interesting these are considered the pillars of the canadian economy. maybe perspectives would change if the sunny ways crowd didn't (for the most part) live where the bulk of the country's manufacturing take place. or maybe they may change when the second pillar collapses?
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #6 by LeafOfBread » Tue Nov 22, 2016 2:37 pm

akiberg wrote:
LeafOfBread wrote:keep this shit out of hockey threads

I will acquiesce if the sunny ways crowd also limit their political thought to this fred as well.

that's fair.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #7 by Thomas Malthus » Tue Nov 22, 2016 2:50 pm

Why is it Trudeau's fault that oil prices are slumping and previous governments encouraged Canadians to use a potentially volatile asset as their retirement plan?
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #8 by clawfirst » Tue Nov 22, 2016 3:06 pm

Well he is French..so im sure we can all come together and blame him for something
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #9 by akiberg » Tue Nov 22, 2016 3:28 pm

Thomas Malthus wrote:Why is it Trudeau's fault that oil prices are slumping and previous governments encouraged Canadians to use a potentially volatile asset as their retirement plan?

but...... I never said it was Trudeau's fault. I think it would be pretty ignorant to blame the woes of the nation on a part time drama teacher. It would almost be as ignorant as believing he's the guy to lead us out of it.
and, how exactly did a conservative government teach/encourage peeps to live beyond their means? conservatism hasn't taught me that, for example.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #10 by akiberg » Tue Nov 22, 2016 3:29 pm

clawfirst wrote:Well he is French..so im sure we can all come together and blame him for something

and his mom is a whore. now we getting somewhere, claw
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #11 by Thomas Malthus » Tue Nov 22, 2016 3:49 pm

akiberg wrote:
Thomas Malthus wrote:Why is it Trudeau's fault that oil prices are slumping and previous governments encouraged Canadians to use a potentially volatile asset as their retirement plan?

but...... I never said it was Trudeau's fault. I think it would be pretty ignorant to blame the woes of the nation on a part time drama teacher. It would almost be as ignorant as believing he's the guy to lead us out of it.
and, how exactly did a conservative government teach/encourage peeps to live beyond their means? conservatism hasn't taught me that, for example.


My mistake, I mistook the sunny ways crowd comment to be a criticism of Trudeau for causing the current predicament.

Contrary to popular belief, the government can do little to spur the economy forward (but a lot to slow it down). Generally speaking, the government's main job is to not fuck up the economy. Most of the fluctuations (good and bad) are beyond the government's control.

The government can have some impact in the long term by using legislation to create incentives for innovation and can have (maybe, the jury is still split on this one) an impact in the short term with emergency stimulus spending. They can impact the economy in the long term through education policy (though remember that this is under the purview of the provincial governments except for most First Nations communities and to the extent that the federal government assists in funding the system) and potentially through certain kinds of investment in public goods.

To be fair, which I like to think I am (for the most part), it wasn't just the Tories that encouraged this. Having said that, the Tories emphasized homeownership and made it much easier to buy a house. It appears they fundamentally believed that everyone should be a homeowner (similar to the position of most American lawmakers), and this sort of makes sense considering that most (not all) Tory MPs are from rural areas where that's the norm or at least the goal. For example, creating a first-time home buyers tax credit, funding to assist first-time buyers in making their down payment, increasing the amount available to non-first time buyers through the use of their RRSPs.

Before the recession, Flaherty loosened underwriting standards significantly and then tightened them again after the recession. Flaherty seemed to realize the mistake in loose housing after understanding the extent of damage it was responsible for in the US. After Flaherty's passing, Harper campaigned on loosening the market up and pushing for a high rate of homeownership (he often brought up the fact that Canadian rate of homeownership eclipsed that in America). This was especially dangerous because we'd known for quite some time that Canada's market was substantially overvalued and pushing for more homeownership would expose more Canadians' retirement plans (their home) to the very real risk of a market correction.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #12 by akiberg » Tue Nov 22, 2016 4:06 pm

well the drama teacher with the majority that Canadians handed him has been the least active PM in decades as far as enacting legislation goes. I wouldn't hold my breath.
RRSP's only real worth is as a down payment on a house. worst investment one could make for themselves, ever.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #13 by paulster » Tue Nov 22, 2016 7:24 pm

akiberg wrote:well the drama teacher with the majority that Canadians handed him has been the least active PM in decades as far as enacting legislation goes. I wouldn't hold my breath.
RRSP's only real worth is as a down payment on a house. worst investment one could make for themselves, ever.


What is a better investment for retirement?
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #14 by clawfirst » Tue Nov 22, 2016 7:45 pm

Well im assuming aki is self employed..and incorporated. Which makes his statement 100% true as corporate tax rates are flat.

For a normal like you..it becomes about risk imo
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #15 by paulster » Tue Nov 22, 2016 8:52 pm

clawfirst wrote:Well im assuming aki is self employed..and incorporated. Which makes his statement 100% true as corporate tax rates are flat.

For a normal like you..it becomes about risk imo


I'll rely on my pension, wife's pension, RRSPs, and just not ever re-up my mortgage then. Should be good.

Have a small business on the side but that's just to make money for ski trips.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #16 by akiberg » Tue Nov 22, 2016 9:11 pm

paulster wrote:
clawfirst wrote:Well im assuming aki is self employed..and incorporated. Which makes his statement 100% true as corporate tax rates are flat.

For a normal like you..it becomes about risk imo


I'll rely on my pension, wife's pension, RRSPs, and just not ever re-up my mortgage then. Should be good.

Have a small business on the side but that's just to make money for ski trips.

i wouldn't put one nickle into RRSP's until I had at least maxed out my TFSA , for starters. Claw is right, I'm in a different group, but I still would invest directly. Capital gains tax is WAY less (actually, justin hasn't really fucked with that either, not all broken promises are bad is what I'm trying to say) than income tax, You are only deferring the income tax, Justin is going to get your money. A hypothetical, the other huge negative is say 20 years from now you have a large sum saved up in RRSP's. and your father in law wants to sell you his porn company. You go to the bank to borrow against your million dollar nest egg RRSP. The bank is going to treat you like a red-headed step child and tell you that your nest egg is worth nothing. Manage your own money.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #17 by paulster » Tue Nov 22, 2016 10:47 pm

Nest eggs are the pensions though. Wife and I have legit pensions (she's a teacher and I'm in some other shady government shit you don't want to know about) so that's what I'm banking on. Freedom 56, or some shit.

The rrsps are just, like, there because it feels like what you're supposed to do. I will look in to this tfsa business but I truly am clueless about it. We are still repaying the home buyers RRSP thing as well. I only claim the minimum repayment every year so I can get a bigger tax return and plop it on the mortgage. Maybe I'll just pay it off faster and allocate rrsp money to tfsa.

But I'll probably just smoke a bowl and change nothing.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #18 by Craig » Tue Nov 22, 2016 10:50 pm

Aki, you know you can manage your own rrsp, right?
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #19 by Craig » Tue Nov 22, 2016 10:51 pm

And like, why would you volunteer to pay cap gains instead of putting it in a tax sheltered account?
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #20 by tbm » Tue Nov 22, 2016 10:53 pm

Big fan of the TFSA, keeps it sheltered away while growing and as aki said you're in control. It's also retroactive so you can stuff around 50k per person in there and let it do it's thing.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #21 by Craig » Tue Nov 22, 2016 11:02 pm

The big difference between a TFSA and RRSP is you can withdraw from the TFSA before retirement. So if it's not retirement savings, go TFSA, no question.

If it is retirement savings, the important question you have to ask yourself is are you in a higher tax bracket now than you will be when retired. RRSP contributions don't count as income now, so you pay less income tax today. But when you retire and withdraw the money, you count it as income then and pay taxes that year. TFSA contributions don't give you a tax discount today, but it doesn't count as income when you withdraw, so no tax hit in the future. Both accounts shelter you from paying capital gains taxes on any investment income.

Other than contribution limits, those are pretty much the only differences.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #22 by clawfirst » Tue Nov 22, 2016 11:53 pm

Im also assuming aki has an agressive market investment strategy that outperforns our safe thinking. Again its a matter of risk and circumstance
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Post #23 by clawfirst » Tue Nov 22, 2016 11:59 pm

Or at least it did outperform it before he got all conservanazi and question life..or whatever happened.

Hope it wasnt too bad Aki. But your textual temperment change is real and not for the better.
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Post #24 by akiberg » Wed Nov 23, 2016 1:15 am

clawfirst wrote:Or at least it did outperform it before he got all conservanazi and question life..or whatever happened.

Hope it wasnt too bad Aki. But your textual temperment change is real and not for the better.

interesting observation. arguing with you central canadian rumprangers about oil and politics is, entertaining. it's a completely different perspective, i learn stuff.
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Post #25 by clawfirst » Wed Nov 23, 2016 1:23 am

Glad to hear it..now for 4 hrs of stare at ceiling pretend sleep cycle
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #26 by akiberg » Wed Nov 23, 2016 1:41 am

Craig wrote:And like, why would you volunteer to pay cap gains instead of putting it in a tax sheltered account?

sure, max out that TFSA. but with the RRSP you are only deferring the tax. that pile of money is also locked in and of zero value if you were to choose to do something later in life.
what you guys in your 20/30's should do is talk to peeps in retirement.
else, you could wait 30 years and have a, fuck i should of listened to aki (again) moment. And.... you'll likely have that moment whilst driving around in your oil fueled automobile.

most of this is moot anyways. canadians, for the most part, are neither maxing out their TFSA's or topping up their RRSP's.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #27 by akiberg » Wed Nov 23, 2016 1:52 am

Craig wrote:The big difference between a TFSA and RRSP is you can withdraw from the TFSA before retirement. So if it's not retirement savings, go TFSA, no question.

If it is retirement savings, the important question you have to ask yourself is are you in a higher tax bracket now than you will be when retired. RRSP contributions don't count as income now, so you pay less income tax today. But when you retire and withdraw the money, you count it as income then and pay taxes that year. TFSA contributions don't give you a tax discount today, but it doesn't count as income when you withdraw, so no tax hit in the future. Both accounts shelter you from paying capital gains taxes on any investment income.

Other than contribution limits, those are pretty much the only differences.

except the whole part where your big nest egg of RRSP money isn't actually worth anything tangible and all you are doing is deferring paying income tax to reap that benefit.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #28 by Craig » Wed Nov 23, 2016 7:40 am

Dude, no. Jesus. Read what you're replying to. How can you be this ignorant and give investment advice?

Other than the year you pay income tax, the tax implications of TFSA vs RRSP are identical. The advantage is you don't pay cap gains taxes on any investment gains on money in either account. Either way you pay income tax.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #29 by akiberg » Wed Nov 23, 2016 9:46 am

Craig wrote:Dude, no. Jesus. Read what you're replying to. How can you be this ignorant and give investment advice?

Other than the year you pay income tax, the tax implications of TFSA vs RRSP are identical. The advantage is you don't pay cap gains taxes on any investment gains on money in either account. Either way you pay income tax.

exactly what I'm saying........ buddy. you are just deferring paying the tax with your RRSP. there, i've now said the same thing multiple times. maybe this time it will sink in.
and the benefit of deferring that tax payment doesn't outweigh having a whole bunch of money tied up into an investment vehicle that offers you ZERO leverage. a TFSA offers the same real benefit without rendering your wealth, useless. mommy government has financial training wheels on you to protect you from yourself. you seem to find comfort in this, I'm ok with that.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #30 by Dynrehab » Wed Nov 23, 2016 12:37 pm

Maybe I'm mistaken, but, by deferring the tax payment, doesn't it give you 40% more money to invest and hopefully grow up front? In a TFSA you get $60 for each hundred, whereas the RRSP gives you 100% and the chance to cash out strategically. My thought is, once you are in the highest tax bracket, there is no reason not to take advantage of the tax deferral, whereas, deferring tax on middle or lower brackets makes sense to use the TFSA.

If there is no difference, why not differ?

Maybe I just don't have any significant reason not to tie up the money. What would you need the liquidity for Aki?

And why are RRSP's considered to be locked in?
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #31 by Craig » Wed Nov 23, 2016 1:19 pm

akiberg wrote:
Craig wrote:Dude, no. Jesus. Read what you're replying to. How can you be this ignorant and give investment advice?

Other than the year you pay income tax, the tax implications of TFSA vs RRSP are identical. The advantage is you don't pay cap gains taxes on any investment gains on money in either account. Either way you pay income tax.

exactly what I'm saying........ buddy. you are just deferring paying the tax with your RRSP. there, i've now said the same thing multiple times. maybe this time it will sink in.
and the benefit of deferring that tax payment doesn't outweigh having a whole bunch of money tied up into an investment vehicle that offers you ZERO leverage. a TFSA offers the same real benefit without rendering your wealth, useless. mommy government has financial training wheels on you to protect you from yourself. you seem to find comfort in this, I'm ok with that.


Cap gains exist though. I'm not arguing against preferring TFSA, I'm saying RRSPs have considerable advantages over non-sheltered accounts.

I would also strongly advise people not to leverage on their fucking retirement fund, but whatevs.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #32 by Craig » Wed Nov 23, 2016 1:27 pm

Dynrehab wrote:Maybe I'm mistaken, but, by deferring the tax payment, doesn't it give you 40% more money to invest and hopefully grow up front? In a TFSA you get $60 for each hundred, whereas the RRSP gives you 100% and the chance to cash out strategically. My thought is, once you are in the highest tax bracket, there is no reason not to take advantage of the tax deferral, whereas, deferring tax on middle or lower brackets makes sense to use the TFSA.

If there is no difference, why not differ?

Maybe I just don't have any significant reason not to tie up the money. What would you need the liquidity for Aki?

And why are RRSP's considered to be locked in?


Your thought is on the money. At the end of the day you're multiplying income*rate of return*income tax. The order you do it in is irrelevant, because math, but if you can work it so the income tax is a lower rate, you win.

RRSPs are locked in because of you withdraw before retirement you pay huge recapture penalties. It should only be done in emergencies and even then you're better off getting a loan of some sort. That's also why you can't use them as leverage for other investments.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #33 by akiberg » Wed Nov 23, 2016 1:49 pm

Craig wrote:
akiberg wrote:
Craig wrote:Dude, no. Jesus. Read what you're replying to. How can you be this ignorant and give investment advice?

Other than the year you pay income tax, the tax implications of TFSA vs RRSP are identical. The advantage is you don't pay cap gains taxes on any investment gains on money in either account. Either way you pay income tax.

exactly what I'm saying........ buddy. you are just deferring paying the tax with your RRSP. there, i've now said the same thing multiple times. maybe this time it will sink in.
and the benefit of deferring that tax payment doesn't outweigh having a whole bunch of money tied up into an investment vehicle that offers you ZERO leverage. a TFSA offers the same real benefit without rendering your wealth, useless. mommy government has financial training wheels on you to protect you from yourself. you seem to find comfort in this, I'm ok with that.


Cap gains exist though. I'm not arguing against preferring TFSA, I'm saying RRSPs have considerable advantages over non-sheltered accounts.

I would also strongly advise people not to leverage on their fucking retirement fund, but whatevs.

you think, small. but whatevs.
I strongly advise against you putting words into peoples mouths. You CAN'T leverage against your RRSP was the whole point. How you invest, what you leverage, what you don't leverage, whose dick you do or don't suck before going to bed at night. all things I care not about, nor do I pretend to offer advise on.
you have yourself convinced that RRSP's work for you. that's fantastic. you've decided the advantages out weigh the disadvantages. that is certainly one opinion.

my TFSA is maxed.
I invest everything else outside of an RRSP.
here we have yet another opinion. I'm sorry you find it so utterly ignorant.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #34 by edgar_dong » Wed Nov 23, 2016 1:53 pm

akiberg wrote:sure, max out that TFSA. but with the RRSP you are only deferring the tax. that pile of money is also locked in and of zero value if you were to choose to do something later in life.
what you guys in your 20/30's should do is talk to peeps in retirement.
else, you could wait 30 years and have a, fuck i should of listened to aki (again) moment. And.... you'll likely have that moment whilst driving around in your oil fueled automobile.

most of this is moot anyways. canadians, for the most part, are neither maxing out their TFSA's or topping up their RRSP's.


In thirty years I reckon we will have been legislated out of our cozy driver's seat(s). Thankfully I will be long since dead.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #35 by Thomas Malthus » Wed Nov 23, 2016 2:37 pm

To be honest, I'm just surprised aki doesn't keep his money under his mattress away from the government and banks.
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Post #36 by Curry Rage » Wed Nov 23, 2016 2:47 pm

Fuck Almighty this is some boring shit.

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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #37 by akiberg » Wed Nov 23, 2016 2:49 pm

Dynrehab wrote:Maybe I'm mistaken, but, by deferring the tax payment, doesn't it give you 40% more money to invest and hopefully grow up front? In a TFSA you get $60 for each hundred, whereas the RRSP gives you 100% and the chance to cash out strategically. My thought is, once you are in the highest tax bracket, there is no reason not to take advantage of the tax deferral, whereas, deferring tax on middle or lower brackets makes sense to use the TFSA.

If there is no difference, why not differ?

Maybe I just don't have any significant reason not to tie up the money. What would you need the liquidity for Aki?

And why are RRSP's considered to be locked in?


Say you have managed to build a huge nest egg within your RRSP. And your second retirement career of educating red-necks is surprisingly lucrative. you could then conceivably find yourself in a higher tax bracket (especially if we keep electing liberal governments, sorry IS, I had to) in retirement than when you originally put the money in there. what craig is saying does hold true for most people. most people plan to live off less when they retire so there would be a net positive tax advantage. BUT, his advise isn't true for everyone. I'll take my tax hit now. When I look at my investments I now know exactly what I have. I don't have to speculate on what tax bracket I'll fall into in my retirement years and be concerned with how much of my nest egg will actually be realized.

maybe I'm wrong but I'm pretty sure there are tax penalties on top of the 'taxable income' that needs to be paid if you withdraw early on your RRSP's.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #38 by akiberg » Wed Nov 23, 2016 2:49 pm

Thomas Malthus wrote:To be honest, I'm just surprised aki doesn't keep his money under his mattress away from the government and banks.

that would have to be an awfully big mattress, thomas. :trump2:
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #39 by akiberg » Wed Nov 23, 2016 2:53 pm

Courage 3.0 wrote:Fuck Almighty this is some boring shit.

Worstest Fred of all times?


viewtopic.php?f=32&t=37335
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #40 by Curry Rage » Wed Nov 23, 2016 3:11 pm

Worser.
*Buy Oil Stocks!*
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #41 by Dynrehab » Wed Nov 23, 2016 3:19 pm

akiberg wrote:
Dynrehab wrote:Maybe I'm mistaken, but, by deferring the tax payment, doesn't it give you 40% more money to invest and hopefully grow up front? In a TFSA you get $60 for each hundred, whereas the RRSP gives you 100% and the chance to cash out strategically. My thought is, once you are in the highest tax bracket, there is no reason not to take advantage of the tax deferral, whereas, deferring tax on middle or lower brackets makes sense to use the TFSA.

If there is no difference, why not differ?

Maybe I just don't have any significant reason not to tie up the money. What would you need the liquidity for Aki?

And why are RRSP's considered to be locked in?


Say you have managed to build a huge nest egg within your RRSP. And your second retirement career of educating red-necks is surprisingly lucrative. you could then conceivably find yourself in a higher tax bracket (especially if we keep electing liberal governments, sorry IS, I had to) in retirement than when you originally put the money in there. what craig is saying does hold true for most people. most people plan to live off less when they retire so there would be a net positive tax advantage. BUT, his advise isn't true for everyone. I'll take my tax hit now. When I look at my investments I now know exactly what I have. I don't have to speculate on what tax bracket I'll fall into in my retirement years and be concerned with how much of my nest egg will actually be realized.

maybe I'm wrong but I'm pretty sure there are tax penalties on top of the 'taxable income' that needs to be paid if you withdraw early on your RRSP's.



I understand this, but I don't agree with the line of thinking, unless I knew my retirement income was going to put me in a higher tax bracket.

Also, you can borrow from your RRSP to pay for a down payment on a house, or personal education.

It is funny to read about penalties for cashing early. Maybe I am missing something, but, generally you pay a withholding tax (basically like escrow) to cover part of what you'd pay when it is taxable, and come tax time, you find out the actual damage, minus the withholding tax. But it's not a penalty, it's just paying taxes. If it puts you into a higher tax bracket than you invested at, it is a net loss. But it's not really a penalty. However, you do lose the RRSP contribution limit after it is cashed.

And Aki, I have never voted Liberal in my life.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #42 by vf » Wed Nov 23, 2016 3:35 pm

akiberg wrote:
Dynrehab wrote:Maybe I'm mistaken, but, by deferring the tax payment, doesn't it give you 40% more money to invest and hopefully grow up front? In a TFSA you get $60 for each hundred, whereas the RRSP gives you 100% and the chance to cash out strategically. My thought is, once you are in the highest tax bracket, there is no reason not to take advantage of the tax deferral, whereas, deferring tax on middle or lower brackets makes sense to use the TFSA.

If there is no difference, why not differ?

Maybe I just don't have any significant reason not to tie up the money. What would you need the liquidity for Aki?

And why are RRSP's considered to be locked in?


Say you have managed to build a huge nest egg within your RRSP. And your second retirement career of educating red-necks is surprisingly lucrative. you could then conceivably find yourself in a higher tax bracket (especially if we keep electing liberal governments, sorry IS, I had to) in retirement than when you originally put the money in there. what craig is saying does hold true for most people. most people plan to live off less when they retire so there would be a net positive tax advantage. BUT, his advise isn't true for everyone. I'll take my tax hit now. When I look at my investments I now know exactly what I have. I don't have to speculate on what tax bracket I'll fall into in my retirement years and be concerned with how much of my nest egg will actually be realized.

maybe I'm wrong but I'm pretty sure there are tax penalties on top of the 'taxable income' that needs to be paid if you withdraw early on your RRSP's.


I really wish you would post more like this more often.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #43 by akiberg » Wed Nov 23, 2016 3:37 pm

Dynrehab wrote:
akiberg wrote:
Dynrehab wrote:Maybe I'm mistaken, but, by deferring the tax payment, doesn't it give you 40% more money to invest and hopefully grow up front? In a TFSA you get $60 for each hundred, whereas the RRSP gives you 100% and the chance to cash out strategically. My thought is, once you are in the highest tax bracket, there is no reason not to take advantage of the tax deferral, whereas, deferring tax on middle or lower brackets makes sense to use the TFSA.

If there is no difference, why not differ?

Maybe I just don't have any significant reason not to tie up the money. What would you need the liquidity for Aki?

And why are RRSP's considered to be locked in?


Say you have managed to build a huge nest egg within your RRSP. And your second retirement career of educating red-necks is surprisingly lucrative. you could then conceivably find yourself in a higher tax bracket (especially if we keep electing liberal governments, sorry IS, I had to) in retirement than when you originally put the money in there. what craig is saying does hold true for most people. most people plan to live off less when they retire so there would be a net positive tax advantage. BUT, his advise isn't true for everyone. I'll take my tax hit now. When I look at my investments I now know exactly what I have. I don't have to speculate on what tax bracket I'll fall into in my retirement years and be concerned with how much of my nest egg will actually be realized.

maybe I'm wrong but I'm pretty sure there are tax penalties on top of the 'taxable income' that needs to be paid if you withdraw early on your RRSP's.



I understand this, but I don't agree with the line of thinking, unless I knew my retirement income was going to put me in a higher tax bracket.


you at least can see there is another line of thinking
not all lines of thinking have to fit within your narrative
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #44 by Thomas Malthus » Wed Nov 23, 2016 5:39 pm

So aki, are RRSPs the worst investment decision someone could make? Or are they simply a tool that you don't believe works for you? You can't call others out on making categorical statements, accusing them of not being able to understand that diverse viewpoints might exist and turn around and fail to do so yourself.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #45 by akiberg » Wed Nov 23, 2016 5:43 pm

Thomas Malthus wrote:So aki, are RRSPs the worst investment decision someone could make? Or are they simply a tool that you don't believe works for you? You can't call others out on making categorical statements, accusing them of not being able to understand that diverse viewpoints might exist and turn around and fail to do so yourself.


that's fair.
but, I still think they are big brotherish
but, they do likely work for most people
but, why would you ever want to be most people?
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #46 by Craig » Wed Nov 23, 2016 7:19 pm

Most people are alright.

Your position is that it's worth paying capital gains tax to be able to leverage your nest egg whenever you want. I'm really not struggling to grasp your position, I'm just pointing out that you're totally, until the last few posts, glossing over the significant advantages RRSPs provide. To each their own, but people were asking for advice in here and you weren't giving them all the information.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #47 by akiberg » Wed Nov 23, 2016 8:08 pm

Craig wrote:Most people are alright.

Your position is that it's worth paying capital gains tax to be able to leverage your nest egg whenever you want. I'm really not struggling to grasp your position, I'm just pointing out that you're totally, until the last few posts, glossing over the significant advantages RRSPs provide. To each their own, but people were asking for advice in here and you weren't giving them all the information.

you jumped in here asking if I knew i could manage my own RRSP and then with great shock and awe wondered how it was even possible someone was recommending against RRSP's. You never once have spoke of the disadvantages, someone had too. You think the advantages are significant, I don't. Never thought I had to make your point too. Food for thought.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #48 by vf » Wed Nov 23, 2016 8:17 pm

vf wrote:I really wish you would post more like this more often.


Whelp. That lasted a long time.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #49 by Craig » Wed Nov 23, 2016 8:20 pm

akiberg wrote:
Craig wrote:Most people are alright.

Your position is that it's worth paying capital gains tax to be able to leverage your nest egg whenever you want. I'm really not struggling to grasp your position, I'm just pointing out that you're totally, until the last few posts, glossing over the significant advantages RRSPs provide. To each their own, but people were asking for advice in here and you weren't giving them all the information.

you jumped in here asking if I knew i could manage my own RRSP and then with great shock and awe wondered how it was even possible someone was recommending against RRSP's. You never once have spoke of the disadvantages, someone had too. You think the advantages are significant, I don't. Never thought I had to make your point too. Food for thought.


I said that as a direct response to "manage your own money" used as an argument against RRSPs.

I very clearly laid out the main disadvantage, which is that you get taxed on withdrawal and the other disadvantage being the penalties on early withdrawal. I didn't feel the the need to highlight the not being able to leverage off it again because in the overwhelming majority of cases that's a terrible idea and you had already talked about it. Also, I did mention it once. So I guess I didn't talk about the disadvantages once, other than the four or five times I talked about them.

I am still surprised that anyone would advise against RRSPs for retirement savings, other than preferring a TFSA or very specific exceptions.
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Re: anarchy 1.0 - aki's politikz

Post #50 by akiberg » Wed Nov 23, 2016 8:30 pm

vf wrote:
vf wrote:I really wish you would post more like this more often.


Whelp. That lasted a long time.

it was a hell of a run though
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