stock tok etc.

..et d'autres discussions ennuyeuses
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Post #1 by PredsFan77 » Wed Jun 25, 2014 1:50 pm

GOLD BITCHEZ
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Post #2 by AD » Wed Jun 25, 2014 2:03 pm

I have some money in gold-backed gold funds. About 3% of my money. I think I want to bring it up to 5%.
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Post #3 by PredsFan77 » Wed Jun 25, 2014 2:05 pm

You should make it 50%
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Post #4 by AD » Wed Jun 25, 2014 2:09 pm

PredsFan77 wrote:You should make it 50%


I should. I should.
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Post #5 by Dog » Wed Jun 25, 2014 4:46 pm

You find an easily defendable land fund yet, nanners?
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Post #6 by AD » Wed Jun 25, 2014 4:50 pm

Dog wrote:You find an easily defendable land fund yet, nanners?


I have. But I haven't bought it yet. I really should though.

You still holding out hope that the digital representation of accumulated wealth in debt instruments and promises made to you by foreign corrupt organizations will see you through the zombie attacks, Chien?
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Post #7 by Dog » Wed Jun 25, 2014 4:55 pm

I hold nothing but the highest regard for the thin line of confidence that holds human civilization together.
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Post #8 by PredsFan77 » Sun Jun 29, 2014 11:09 pm

This will be an enjoyable bubble to watch pop, I assume the nips have been doing the same thing in western canuckistan:

http://nymag.com/news/features/foreigners-hiding-money-new-york-real-estate-2014-6/
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Post #9 by PredsFan77 » Fri Jul 25, 2014 9:30 pm

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/my-travels-with-larry/article19557387/

Cheap at sea, pricey on the plate: The voodoo of lobster economics
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Post #10 by Slick Nick » Sun Jul 27, 2014 1:56 am

How do I invest in salt?
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Post #11 by PredsFan77 » Sun Jul 27, 2014 3:22 pm

Corner the sodium market
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Post #12 by AD » Wed Jul 30, 2014 1:32 pm

Guys,

I have a bit of money in another tax sheltered account (Kids ed fund). Its not much, but every year I'm planning on adding 2k. (I'm at 9k so far).

I'm looking for a different strategy than my general "index funds from around the world" one. (My wife and I are about 98% in various equity indices in our non real estate investments - and thats just because I have a few Ks in gold).

What do you guys think of a mix of these (1 High yield maybe with something safer) for bond funds for the RESP:

VWEHX https://personal.vanguard.com/us/funds/snapshot?FundId=0029&FundIntExt=INT

HYG https://fr-ca.finance.yahoo.com/q?s=HYG

XHY http://ca.ishares.com/product_info/fund/overview/XHY.htm

VAB https://www.vanguardcanada.ca/individual/etfs-detail-overview.htm?portId=9552
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Post #13 by PredsFan77 » Wed Jul 30, 2014 1:45 pm

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Post #14 by AD » Wed Jul 30, 2014 1:48 pm

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Post #15 by Dog » Wed Jul 30, 2014 2:18 pm



Obvious red flag here is that these are mature companies run by 85 year olds that have already passed their high growth phase. Mlooking at past performance will make these look great, future performance is another thing.
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Post #16 by Artie » Wed Jul 30, 2014 2:33 pm



AD wrote:I like it!


calls broker moves 100K into various funds
:mkbét::lr: :lr:

OOOH yeah life goes on, long after the thrill of Vinny is gone

It's too bad all the people that could really run the Habs are busy doing talk radio, writing blogs or posting on message boards.

Now, Lajoie is an imbecile, a cretin and a plagiarist, who to use author Dany Laferrière's deliciously withering expression, "lives beyond his intellectual means."

...as serious as a poutine shortage in Chicoutimi during a curling bonspiel...

Haddock wrote:I wouldn't know anything about that. I gave my soul up when I swore allegiance to the goddamn queen.


:lr: :lr: :lr:
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Post #17 by Artie » Wed Jul 30, 2014 2:33 pm

Dog wrote:Obvious red flag here is that these are mature companies run by 85 year olds that have already passed their high growth phase. Mlooking at past performance will make these look great, future performance is another thing.


phaque

calls broker

sell sell sell
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OOOH yeah life goes on, long after the thrill of Vinny is gone



It's too bad all the people that could really run the Habs are busy doing talk radio, writing blogs or posting on message boards.



Now, Lajoie is an imbecile, a cretin and a plagiarist, who to use author Dany Laferrière's deliciously withering expression, "lives beyond his intellectual means."



...as serious as a poutine shortage in Chicoutimi during a curling bonspiel...



Haddock wrote:I wouldn't know anything about that. I gave my soul up when I swore allegiance to the goddamn queen.




:lr: :lr: :lr:
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Post #18 by Dog » Wed Jul 30, 2014 2:34 pm

AD wrote:Guys,

I have a bit of money in another tax sheltered account (Kids ed fund). Its not much, but every year I'm planning on adding 2k. (I'm at 9k so far).

I'm looking for a different strategy than my general "index funds from around the world" one. (My wife and I are about 98% in various equity indices in our non real estate investments - and thats just because I have a few Ks in gold).

What do you guys think of a mix of these (1 High yield maybe with something safer) for bond funds for the RESP:

VWEHX https://personal.vanguard.com/us/funds/snapshot?FundId=0029&FundIntExt=INT

HYG https://fr-ca.finance.yahoo.com/q?s=HYG

XHY http://ca.ishares.com/product_info/fund/overview/XHY.htm

VAB https://www.vanguardcanada.ca/individual/etfs-detail-overview.htm?portId=9552


Have some bonds if you want some bonds in your portfolio. Bonds are still extremely expensive (high yield as well) and likely to return poorly for the foreseeable future after a decades long historic bullish bond run -but hey, stock is also extremely expensive.

I'm personally not a fan of bond funds at current yields, can find better or equivalent in term deposits/gics ladders without management fees.

Within your rrsp you can purchase quebec bonds (epargne placements quebec) who will add an additional 1% for the first year. So if you buy a 1 year bond paying 1.4%, you get 2.4%. That for a one year bond. With vab (and similar mid term balanced bond funds) you get a weighted average yield to maturity of 2.4% but for a weighted average duration of 7.4 years! I rather take the shorter term at current rates for the same yield. Within tfsa, a cdic insured online bank (peoples trust) pays 3% for their hisa. So, i keep my bond allocation within rrsp (to get the epq 1% bonus) and tfsa (to get the 3%). 2.4% and 3% all on short terms without management fees. Can't get that with bond funds.

The high yield funds currently have yields to maturity in the 4% range for durations around 4 years. I rather (and do) buy stuff like bce paying 5%+ dividends with (i don't think) any greater risk. Plus canadian dividends get taxed slightly more favorably than interest, which increases your after tax yield in taxable accounts.
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Post #19 by Artie » Wed Jul 30, 2014 3:15 pm

simple math thomas

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OOOH yeah life goes on, long after the thrill of Vinny is gone



It's too bad all the people that could really run the Habs are busy doing talk radio, writing blogs or posting on message boards.



Now, Lajoie is an imbecile, a cretin and a plagiarist, who to use author Dany Laferrière's deliciously withering expression, "lives beyond his intellectual means."



...as serious as a poutine shortage in Chicoutimi during a curling bonspiel...



Haddock wrote:I wouldn't know anything about that. I gave my soul up when I swore allegiance to the goddamn queen.




:lr: :lr: :lr:
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Post #20 by AD » Wed Jul 30, 2014 3:31 pm

Thanks dog.
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Post #21 by Craig » Wed Jul 30, 2014 5:54 pm

Why are you looking for a different strategy?
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Post #22 by Dog » Wed Jul 30, 2014 5:57 pm

Craig wrote:Why are you looking for a different strategy?


He has more money than he knows what to do with. Not easy finding a place to store it all.

:danson:
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Post #23 by PredsFan77 » Wed Jul 30, 2014 6:32 pm

Dog wrote:Obvious red flag here is that these are mature companies run by 85 year olds that have already passed their high growth phase. Mlooking at past performance will make these look great, future performance is another thing.


shit you got it all figured out then. Better put it all in social media funds then, AD. That's where the high growth is gonna be. Tell your kids you don't have any money for their college because you bought up farmersonly.com
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Post #24 by AD » Wed Jul 30, 2014 6:43 pm

Craig wrote:Why are you looking for a different strategy?


I don't. I just feel that 100% stocks is stupid somehow. A bit if fixed income i suppose

Too much money and too much time i guess.
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Post #25 by Artie » Wed Jul 30, 2014 10:54 pm

AD wrote:I don't. I just feel that 100% stocks is stupid somehow. A bit if fixed income i suppose

Too much money and too much time i guess.


wasn't the Saguenay Fids taking care of this for you
:mkbét::lr: :lr:



OOOH yeah life goes on, long after the thrill of Vinny is gone



It's too bad all the people that could really run the Habs are busy doing talk radio, writing blogs or posting on message boards.



Now, Lajoie is an imbecile, a cretin and a plagiarist, who to use author Dany Laferrière's deliciously withering expression, "lives beyond his intellectual means."



...as serious as a poutine shortage in Chicoutimi during a curling bonspiel...



Haddock wrote:I wouldn't know anything about that. I gave my soul up when I swore allegiance to the goddamn queen.




:lr: :lr: :lr:
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Post #26 by Artie » Wed Jul 30, 2014 10:57 pm

Vanguard - FTSE Canadian High Dividend Yield Index ETF (VDY)


thoughts?
:mkbét::lr: :lr:



OOOH yeah life goes on, long after the thrill of Vinny is gone



It's too bad all the people that could really run the Habs are busy doing talk radio, writing blogs or posting on message boards.



Now, Lajoie is an imbecile, a cretin and a plagiarist, who to use author Dany Laferrière's deliciously withering expression, "lives beyond his intellectual means."



...as serious as a poutine shortage in Chicoutimi during a curling bonspiel...



Haddock wrote:I wouldn't know anything about that. I gave my soul up when I swore allegiance to the goddamn queen.




:lr: :lr: :lr:
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Post #27 by Craig » Thu Jul 31, 2014 12:13 am

AD wrote:I don't. I just feel that 100% stocks is stupid somehow. A bit if fixed income i suppose

Too much money and too much time i guess.


Don't just use your kids education fund to give you fixed income exposure. You need to look at the lifestyles of your various investments and put the fixed income where it makes sense. Also, go back a few pages and read the dog's explanation of which investment types should go in protected accounts and which shouldn't.
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Post #28 by PredsFan77 » Fri Aug 08, 2014 9:23 am

This sounds like a good idea....

FICO Recalibrates Its Credit Scores

Changes Could Lead to More Bank Lending, Easier Credit for Some Consumers

A change in how the most widely used credit score in the U.S. is tallied will likely make it easier for tens of millions of Americans to get loans.

Fair Isaac Corp. FICO -1.19% said Thursday that it will stop including in its FICO credit-score calculations any record of a consumer failing to pay a bill if the bill has been paid or settled with a collection agency. The San Jose, Calif., company also will give less weight to unpaid medical bills that are with a collection agency.

The moves follow months of discussions with lenders and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau aimed at boosting lending without creating more credit risk. Since the recession, many lenders have approved only the best borrowers, usually those with few or no blemishes on their credit report.

The changes are expected to boost consumer lending, especially among borrowers shut out of the market or charged high interest rates because of their low scores. "It expands banks' ability to make loans for people who might not have qualified and to offer a lower price [for others]," said Nessa Feddis, senior vice president of consumer protection and payments at the American Bankers Association, a trade group.

As of July, about 64.3 million consumers in the U.S. had a medical collection on their credit report, according to data from credit bureau Experian. And of the 106.5 million consumers with a collection on their report, 9.4 million had no balance—and won't be penalized under the new credit-score system.

Some critics said that loosening standards could bring losses for borrowers and lenders. "A lot of people really just can't handle credit—you're not really helping them by allowing them to dig themselves into debt," said Howard Strong, a lawyer in Tarzana, Calif., who specializes in consumer-protection class-action lawsuits. "It's like a sharp knife—if you don't know how to use it, you can cut yourself."

Many types of debt, including credit cards, can be discharged in bankruptcy. If borrowers fall behind, they could file for bankruptcy and cause lenders to suffer losses, Mr. Strong said.

A Consumer Financial Protection Bureau spokeswoman declined to comment on the changes by Fair Isaac.

Under the current system, collections can impact credit scores as much as foreclosures and bankruptcies do. But the infractions are often small. Borrowers can be on time paying their debts, for example, but thrown by a medical emergency.

Collections stay on credit reports for as long as seven years, even if a borrower has paid off that balance and remained up-to-date on other debts.

Some experts said the new model for FICO scores walks a fine line: It loosens standards without overstating the creditworthiness of borrowers. Fair Isaac said it ran studies to determine how likely borrowers are to repay their debts if they had a stellar credit record with the exception of such collections.

Consumers often are unaware that their insurance company isn't paying a medical bill and can end up in default and in collection without knowing it, said Anthony Sprauve, senior consumer credit specialist with Fair Isaac. In contrast, lenders often send repeated notifications to consumers to let them know they have fallen behind.

Most lenders check applicants' FICO scores to help determine whether to extend credit to consumers and what interest rate to charge. Fair Isaac will begin rolling out the new scoring model, named FICO 9, to credit bureaus this fall and to lenders later this year.

More than half of all debt-collection activity on consumers' credit reports comes from medical bills, according to the Federal Reserve. Such activity results in lower credit scores for consumers, meaning that lenders are more likely to be cautious in extending credit.

The number of U.S. consumers struggling with medical debt has been surging. As of 2012, 41% of U.S. adults, or 75 million people, had trouble paying medical bills, up from 58 million in 2005, according to a report released last year by the Commonwealth Fund.

The CFPB, in a May report, criticized credit-scoring models used by the financial industry, saying they put too much emphasis on unpaid medical debt and lead to an overly negative view of consumers. CFPB officials say that medical debt is inherently different from other forms of debt because consumers are often unaware of what they owe to hospitals and doctors.

FICO scores have many competitors but are the most widely used. Lenders used them in 90% of consumer and mortgage loan decisions, according to a study this year by the CEB TowerGroup, a financial-services research firm. VantageScore Solutions LLC, a rival credit-scoring firm in Stamford, Conn., rolled out a new scoring model in March 2013 that excludes all paid collections.

Fair Isaac releases new scoring models every few years, and it is up to lenders to choose which ones to use. The new score will likely be adopted by credit-card and auto lenders first, says John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education at CreditSesame.com and a former Fair Isaac manager.

Mortgages are likely to lag, since the FICO scores used by most mortgage lenders are two versions old.

The impact of the changes on borrowers is likely to be significant. Accounts that are sent to collections, including credit-card debts and utility bills, can stay on borrowers' credit reports for as long as seven years, even when their balance drops to zero, and can lower their scores by up to 100 points, said Mr. Ulzheimer.

The lower weight given to unpaid medical debt could increase some affected borrowers' FICO scores by 25 points, said Mr. Sprauve.

Even a small move in a borrowers' credit score can change the outcome of a loan application. Most lenders have a minimum credit-score requirement to lend to an applicant, and lenders can deny someone whose score is even one point below the minimum.

Lenders determine the interest rate a borrower will get based on the borrower's credit-score bracket.

For example, borrowers with a FICO score between 760 and 850 get an average interest rate of 3.823% on a fixed-rate, 30-year mortgage of $300,000, according to Informa Research Services, a market-research company in Calabasas, Calif.

Borrowers with a 759 FICO score get a 4.045% interest rate on the same loan. Over the life of the loan, the 760 borrower would pay $204,650 in interest charges—or $13,764 less than the 759 borrower.
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Post #29 by edgar_dong » Tue Aug 19, 2014 12:48 am

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Post #30 by PredsFan77 » Tue Aug 19, 2014 1:37 pm

My Altius mineral stock is on fire. If Alderon ever got financing it'd go to the moon.
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Post #31 by mayoradamwest » Tue Aug 19, 2014 4:54 pm

The sandwich heavy portfolio pays off for the hungry investor.
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Post #32 by Dog » Wed Oct 01, 2014 12:15 pm

This downturn is starting to show some promise.

Been keeping cash for a long while waiting for a significant drop.

:fingerscrossed:
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Post #33 by Craig » Wed Oct 01, 2014 12:18 pm

Yeah, it's been a pretty decent correction. I'm down like 8%, which cut my earnings since I bought back in last year a little more than in half. Actually, probably pretty close to in half once you take the dividends into account.
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Post #34 by Dog » Wed Oct 01, 2014 12:25 pm

Craig wrote:Yeah, it's been a pretty decent correction. I'm down like 8%, which cut my earnings since I bought back in last year a little more than in half. Actually, probably pretty close to in half once you take the dividends into account.


Hoarding cash like i did makes no sense, it's loss aversion more than rational decision making. Cash i would have invested early 2013 suffered a huge opportunity cost loss. Last few weeks, i even sold some. That's looking like a good guess. I got super lucky back in 2008 selling the bulk of my portfolio at near market highs. Not so lucky when i sold again in 2010 only to give in and reinvest again in 2012. Cash i've been hoarding since 2013 also looks like a losing proposition on the whole. All in all, i'm probably about even with all my market timing attempts, which is probably pretty lucky.
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Post #35 by AD » Wed Oct 01, 2014 12:46 pm

I'm planning on buying around October 30th with thebit of cash left.
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Post #36 by Dog » Wed Oct 01, 2014 12:53 pm

Yer likely down less than that, aren't you greg? Iirc most of your holdings are in usd. The drop in the cad likely netted you some nice gains. I wish i had converted more to usd, albeit i already have the majority of my savings in usd.
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Post #37 by Craig » Wed Oct 01, 2014 12:55 pm

Dog wrote:Yer likely down less than that, aren't you greg? Iirc most of your holdings are in usd. The drop in the cad likely netted you some nice gains. I wish i had converted more to usd, albeit i already have the majority of my savings in usd.


I'm not counting the currency conversion. On my investment horizon there's really no point.
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Post #38 by Dog » Wed Oct 01, 2014 12:57 pm

Craig wrote:I'm not counting the currency conversion. On my investment horizon there's really no point.


My brokers portfolio software does it automatically.
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Post #39 by Craig » Wed Oct 01, 2014 12:58 pm

Mine probably does too. I track everything on Google finance most of the time though, it's just more convenient.
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Post #40 by Dog » Wed Oct 01, 2014 12:59 pm

I'm actually wondering if at around 89 cents it's worth converting anymore. Historical mean is around that. I prefer the us domiciled funds rather than the canadian wraps of those funds (lower fees and no tax drag on inter fund withholding) but there is no more free lunch there. Was a no brainer to go to usd nearer parity.
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Post #41 by Dog » Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:00 pm

Craig wrote:Mine probably does too. I track everything on Google finance most of the time though, it's just more convenient.


Same. I log in to the brokers account maybe once a month or so.
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Post #42 by Craig » Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:17 pm

Dog wrote:Same. I log in to the brokers account maybe once a month or so.


I just wish it had a way to do DRIPs nicely. Right now I just do small buys with 0 cost to account for it and figure it's close enough.
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Post #43 by Dog » Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:29 pm

Craig wrote:I just wish it had a way to do DRIPs nicely. Right now I just do small buys with 0 cost to account for it and figure it's close enough.


What do you mean? Your broker should have drip agreements with the plain vanilla funds. Call them and activate it, it gets done automatically.

I forget who you are with, but if they don't have a usd account you may get dinged on conversion fees (they might be converting the usd dividend to cad and then converting the cad to usd to buy the shares with the dividend, the basterds).
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Post #44 by Craig » Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:31 pm

Dog wrote:What do you mean? Your broker should have drip agreements with the plain vanilla funds. Call them and activate it, it gets done automatically.

I forget who you are with, but if they don't have a usd account you may get dinged on conversion fees (they might be converting the usd dividend to cad and then converting the cad to usd to buy the shares with the dividend, the basterds).


Google finance.
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Post #45 by Dog » Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:34 pm

Craig wrote:Google finance.


Yeah, they don't take dividends or conversion rates into accounts which makes it virtually useless long term (dividends are a huge part of long term returns) I just use google to get a quick glance of how my holdings and "watch list" are doing daily. I use the brokers portfolio tool for an accurate picture of the portfolio-which i only look at once in a while.
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Post #46 by Craig » Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:52 pm

Dog wrote:Yeah, they don't take dividends or conversion rates into accounts which makes it virtually useless long term (dividends are a huge part of long term returns) I just use google to get a quick glance of how my holdings and "watch list" are doing daily. I use the brokers portfolio tool for an accurate picture of the portfolio-which i only look at once in a while.


They do dividends, but only to cash. If they did DRIPs it would be pretty good.
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Post #47 by Dog » Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:59 pm

Craig wrote:They do dividends, but only to cash. If they did DRIPs it would be pretty good.


They automatically add the dividends to your cash holdings?

I never noticed (don't look at the portfolio there, just the tickers for the day).
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Post #48 by Craig » Wed Oct 01, 2014 2:00 pm

Dog wrote:They automatically add the dividends to your cash holdings?

I never noticed (don't look at the portfolio there, just the tickers for the day).


It's an option.

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