The Saudi Arabian Consulate in Istanbul Thread

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #51 by shredz [Bot] » Wed Oct 03, 2018 2:12 am

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #52 by shredz [Bot] » Thu Oct 04, 2018 6:02 am

The US military spokesman of the coalition forces in Syria confirmed that his forces “were in no danger” during the strikes which took place only miles (five km) from the US position. The Iranians succeeded in walking a very tight rope without tearing it.


This week’s strikes were a repeat performance of June 2017. Last year, Iran fired six Zolfaqar missiles on ISIS targets in the Deir Ezzur area of Syria in retaliation for twin terror attacks in Tehran.

The first Israeli reports were dramatic. This was because of an erroneous initial report that Iran used Shahab-3 missiles with a 800 miles (1,280 km) range, which would be capable of reaching targets within Israel. The official Iranian announcement that it fired Zolfaqar missiles with a much shorter range—which wouldn’t be capable of reaching Israel—immediately lowered the threat and fear threshold.

In contrast to the intense preoccupation in Israel with Iran’s ballistic missiles during 2017, reactions to this week’s missiles were mild. Reports on the Iranian strikes in major Israeli newspapers—such as Ha’aretz, Yediot Aharonot, and Maariv—were relegated to the inner pages and limited to short informative summaries. Israeli reports on Iran that aren’t belligerent in tone are a bit surprising.

A possible byproduct of the Iranian strikes may be that they will acclimatize the international community to Iran’s defensive use of ballistic missiles while scrupulously abiding by the JCPOA, which blocked its path to nuclear weapons and placed it under the most intrusive IAEA monitoring in history.

On a strategic level, it seems Israeli deterrence in Syria works and that Tehran isn’t eager to get caught up in an all-out confrontation with Israel. The Iranian firing of missiles on Syria could be seen as a form of communication by which non-verbal messages are transmitted to the other side. According to this interpretation, the strikes were carried out in a way that wouldn’t be perceived by Israel as a threat against Israeli targets, despite the “death to Israel” messaging.

Tehran signaled this by using missiles that don’t have the range to hit Israel. This was also done by choosing a launching site that didn’t put Israel within range of the strikes. In both cases, the launches from Kermanshah to Syria meant that the missiles were on a geographic line to the Mediterranean Sea north of Syria—not on a direct line continuing southward to Israel. This reflects an internal syntax of strategy.

Nevertheless, the message are the missiles themselves. No longer are the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps missile testing—they are now firing on another state. Iran has crossed an invisible but very meaningful line.


http://www.atlanticcouncil.org/blogs/ir ... rom-israel
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #53 by shredz [Bot] » Sat Oct 06, 2018 10:38 am

After the creation of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the forerunner of the Central Intelligence Agency, Eddy was assigned to the OSS. He played a central role in collecting intelligence in French North Africa be-fore the Allied invasion in 1942, but his proposals to arm the Arab population against the French Vichy colonial government were regarded as too dangerous by the Allied military command, which did not want to encourage Arab nationalism.9 He acquired a reputation for espionage daring and expertise in Arabia. In 1943 Eddy was assigned to Saudi Arabia and in November 1944 he was promoted to the position of American chargé to the kingdom. After the war Eddy would play a part in the early development of the Central Intelligence Agency.
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #54 by shredz [Bot] » Sat Oct 06, 2018 10:41 am

Ibn Saud had come from Jidda on an American destroyer, the USS Murphy, with an entourage of bodyguards, cooks, and slaves, plus an astrologer, a fortuneteller, and other retainers— and some sheep. The Murphy was the first- ever American Navy vessel to visit Jidda. The Navy’s only available charts dated from 1834. The king only reluctantly agreed to leave his wives behind in Jidda when he was told their privacy could not be assured in the crowded space of a destroyer.

Aboard the USS Murphy the king and his entourage slept and ate on the deck. They slaughtered a lamb they had brought with them and prayed five times a day, relying on the destroyer captain to tell them the direction to Mecca. Ibn Saud was introduced to apple pie à la mode and loved it. The king saw his first movie, The First Lady, a documentary about the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown fighting in the Pacific against the Japanese Imperial Navy. The one- hour Technicolor film had exciting scenes of aerial dogfights and crashes on the flight deck. Another American movie was shown to the king’s entourage later, Best Foot Forward, a Lucille Ball musical comedy that featured a scene where her dress was ripped off. Ibn Saud’s sons decided it was not fitting for their father.
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #55 by shredz [Bot] » Sat Oct 06, 2018 4:53 pm

The king raised one issue at the start. He had received a message that British prime minister Winston Churchill wanted to see him in Egypt. Churchill had learned from FDR on the final day of the Yalta summit of FDR’s upcoming visit to see Ibn Saud. Churchill was determined that the Middle East re-main the sole preserve of the British Empire when the war ended, and he was not going to let FDR get a jump on London. The Saudis had had a difficult relationship with the British for decades, largely because the British backed their Arab rivals, the Hashemites, and sought domination of the Arabian Peninsula. Ibn Saud wanted FDR’s advice: Should he meet with Churchill? The president, who increasingly regarded Churchill as a Victorian imperialist anti-que wedded to keeping the empire intact, told the king to see Churchill. He was, undoubtedly, confident that Churchill would misplay his meeting with the Saudis and only reinforce Ibn Saud’s inclination to tilt to Washington.
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #56 by shredz [Bot] » Sat Oct 06, 2018 5:11 pm

Lunch was served in the captain’s mess below decks. On the way down in the elevator, FDR stopped the lift and smoked two cigarettes, having refrained from smoking in the king’s presence. Lunch was prepared by the president’s Filipino chefs from the White House. On the menu were curried lamb, rice, grapefruit, eggs, raisins, tomatoes, olives, pickles, chutney, and coconut. The king was so pleased that he asked if he could be given the chef as a gift. In the Kingdom, royal chefs were slaves. FDR cleverly told the king the chef had a contract with the U.S. Navy and could not break it
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #57 by PredsFan77 » Sat Oct 06, 2018 6:59 pm

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #58 by shredz [Bot] » Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:50 am

ENEMA OF THE PEOPLE.
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #59 by shredz [Bot] » Mon Oct 08, 2018 11:18 am

A senior Turkish police source told MEE that police believed that Khashoggi, a prominent critic of the Saudi government, was "brutally tortured, killed and cut into pieces" inside the consulate after visiting the building on 2 October.

"Everything was videotaped to prove the mission had been accomplished and the tape was taken out of the country," the source said.

An unnamed Turkish official told the Reuters news agency that Turkish police believed Khashoggi had been killed and his body then removed from the building.

"The initial assessment of the Turkish police is that Mr Khashoggi has been killed at the consulate of Saudi Arabia in Istanbul. We believe that the murder was premeditated and the body was subsequently moved out of the consulate," said the official.


https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/turk ... 1250529206

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #60 by shredz [Bot] » Wed Oct 10, 2018 12:05 pm

The Great Betrayal: Jean-Paul Sartre and the Arabs

by Yoav di-Capua

It was the most intense intellectual and political love story that modern Arab intellectuals had ever had with a living European thinker and – even better – the sentiment was mutual. From the late 1940s to the late 1960s, Jean-Paul Sartre’s philosophy, and his political recipes for self-emancipation, guided the project of Arab liberation. From the very beginning, Middle Eastern intellectuals considered Sartre’s ideas rich, meaningful and appropriate for their needs. Their goal was ambitious: the invention of a new type of Arab man and woman: sovereign, authentic, self-confident, self-sufficient, proud, willing to sacrifice and therefore, existentially free. Tampering with existence was their key strategy for a smooth exit from the legacy of colonial dehumanization, and Sartre’s intellectual fingerprints were all over this strategy. By the late 1950s the Arab world could boast of having the largest existentialist scene outside Europe. Indeed, almost everything that Sartre said and wrote during these years was translated to Arabic as soon as it hit the French market.

Image

Sartre too was infatuated. Frustrated with European political passivity of the 1960s, he was enchanted by the sheer energy and broad horizons of the Arab revolutionary project. At the peak of this affair, Sartre and his home-made diplomatic crew came, in person, to pay respect to the Arab revolutionary project. And for a brief moment, the alliance appeared to be indestructible. And yet, for all the high philosophical talk about existence and revolution, the affair ended bitterly and Sartre would be forever remembered as a traitor to the Arab cause. Not just a traitor but one of the worst kind: a former friend. Here is a brief account of this painful trans-Mediterranean affair, its promise, and its demise

As World War II drew to a close and colonialism was in full retreat, a small but influential circle of Arab philosophers identified the sphere of being as the most intellectually significant problem to reckon with. What does it mean to be a person after colonialism? After decades during which Arabs were struggling objects in the closed world of European consciousness, who and what dominated the definition of the self and the political community to which it belonged? To answer this question and produce ideal conditions for cultural rejuvenation, they turned to philosophy and, specifically, to phenomenology and its new branch, existentialism. Studying with the very best teachers Europe could offer, they slowly learned that the essence of their colonized being was not fixed. That is, that the Left Bank slogan of Parisian youth, “existence precedes essence,” carries a very special promise of liberation. They realized that their struggle to become free and modern had nothing to do with the purported “essence” of an Islam framed as antithetical to reason, science, democracy and individualism.

Rather, it was a simple relational issue. Just as existentialism made Simone de Beauvoir realize that “One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman,” it made colonized people understand the very process that made them inherently and irredeemably inferior. Existentialism not only exposed the paradoxical impossibility of the colonial demand but also offered tools to transcend it through self-liberation. The groundwork had already been laid a few years beforehand, as young philosophers had labored over how Islamic mysticism could be reconciled with Heidegger’s philosophy of being for the sake of creating an authentic and free individual. When Sartre’s work arrived to the Middle East it interfaced with this already-established philosophical opportunity, perfecting and substantiating it in simple and actionable ways.

The first such attempt was to generate a local version of Sartre’s idea of commitment, or engagement. According to Sartre, because writing is a consequential form of acting and being, intellectuals must assume political responsibility for their work and the circumstances that condition it. That meant that old guard intellectuals who were comfortable with the cultural assumptions of colonialism should be marginalized and retired. In their place, a new cadre of writers began the tedious work of intellectual decolonization. Known in Arabic as iltizam, this call for responsibility joined to professional action reorganized the cultural sphere and came to determine the political viability and legitimacy of any new idea. It also launched the careers of young thinkers, destroyed those of the established intellectual guard and established the norm that in decolonization culture and politics are inseparable.

Most influential, however, was Arab intellectuals’ engagement with Sartre’s anti-colonial humanism, a cluster of thought that meaningfully connected the Arab world to Third-Worldism and the big struggles of the 1960s. This body of thought was shared by Sartre, Frantz Fanon, Aimé Césaire, Léopold Sédar Senghor, and many other, lesser-known intellectuals from the former colonies. Together, these intellectuals developed the foundations of post-colonial thinking about race and otherness as well as concrete concepts such as settler colonialism and neo-colonialism. These were not simply ideas but politics that translated to specific struggles for liberation in Cuba, Congo, Vietnam, Rhodesia and of course Algeria. It is the same body of thought that would eventually connect seemingly unrelated struggles such as those of the Black Panthers in the US with the revolutionary politics of Algerian freedom fighters. Today we call this intersectionality. Back then, there were no fancy words to describe the daily business of the Global South. Being the first global thinker to engage international politics on that level, Sartre was intellectually involved in all of these struggles. He readily acknowledged the oppression to which colonized people were subjected and his thought paved the way for self-liberation. The ultimate destination was global citizenship. In the service of this goal, Sartre weaponized ideas and mobilized metropolitan public opinion on behalf of all of these struggles.

That is, all of them except one – Palestine. Sartre’s silence on the conflict in Palestine mystified his Arab interlocutors. How could the person who contributed to the intellectual DNA of Arab decolonization – who had explained to them in no uncertain terms that they are the “collective others” of colonialism – not see that Zionists in Palestine were doing the exact same thing as French colonizers in Algeria and British ones in Rhodesia? What was unclear here? Was Sartre a crypto-Zionist? How could he turn his back on his own intellectual legacy to make such an exception? The truth of the matter was that Sartre’s political paralysis was due to an irresolvable philosophical conundrum. Yes, he was one of the first thinkers to reckon otherness and translate oppression into viable ethical frameworks that were clear and actionable. That was the basis for his position on Algeria, by which he went against his own motherland, and it was the basis for his support for anti-colonial violence. He could certainly see and recognize Arabs as the “Others” of colonialism and even of Palestinians as the victimized “Others” of Zionism. However, he had no idea how to reconcile two “others” that existed in the case of Palestine. Who was right? Who deserved what, and on which ethical ground? Who was a greater victim? Sartre could not resolve this question and the fact that his own society was instrumental in the destruction of European Jews did not help, either. Indeed, Arabs began to suspect that he was trading in ethical reparations for Zionists.

Responding to Arab and Israeli pressures to clarify his position (that is, to declare once and for all who was “right”), Sartre decided to visit Egypt, Gaza, and Israel. He did so on the late-night eve of the 1967 war, a war that would forever destroy the Arab project of liberation. The visit went relatively well, with both sides respecting Sartre’s request for time and space in order to formulate and then publish his opinion. The Israeli press called Sartre the philosopher of the Arabs and knew fairly well how instrumental he was for their liberation project. The Arab side suspected he was pro-Zionist but had no proof of it. For his part, Sartre was simply confused. As the visit ended and the chain-smoking philosopher returned to his Parisian apartment to write down his thoughts on the conflict, a full-scale Arab-Israeli war was already in the air. In the weeks prior to it, the general sense in Europe was that Israel would be forever destroyed. Sartre’s Jewish friends and their many acquaintances on the Left asked him to support their cause and avoid a so-called “second Holocaust.” He was reluctant to do so. After more pressure, he finally relented and, on the eve of the war, signed a petition on behalf of Israel. The who’s who of French culture, from Picasso to Marguerite Duras, signed the petition. His Arab interlocutors were stunned. But before they could even organize themselves to protest this signature, the war came, and destroyed everything for which they had struggled. Their project was in ruins, and Sartre was forever implicated in the most significant Arab defeat of modern times. So began, and so ended, a passionate intellectual and political affair, founded in visions of total freedom and concluded in heartache and infamy.


Yoav di Capua, No Exit: Arab Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre and Decolonization
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #61 by shredz [Bot] » Wed Oct 10, 2018 12:29 pm



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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #62 by shredz [Bot] » Wed Oct 10, 2018 1:29 pm

The Khoeis are a smart clan.

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #63 by Dog » Wed Oct 10, 2018 1:54 pm

shredz wrote:Yoav di Capua, No Exit: Arab Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre and Decolonization


Why wasn’t Florida simply given to the Israli state as a homeland?

:why:
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #64 by shredz [Bot] » Wed Oct 10, 2018 2:00 pm

Image

Came across this pile of huh before.
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #65 by PredsFan77 » Wed Oct 10, 2018 9:24 pm

so shred what do your sources say happen to the dude
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #66 by shredz [Bot] » Thu Oct 11, 2018 12:48 am

THE CIA:

"We doubt the Saudi's did that."

"It was Iran"
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #67 by shredz [Bot] » Thu Oct 11, 2018 1:50 am

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #68 by shredz [Bot] » Fri Oct 12, 2018 7:42 am

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #69 by shredz [Bot] » Fri Oct 12, 2018 7:57 am

The Turks bugged the consulate. This is going to get ugly.

Muslim Brotherhood wants revenge!
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #70 by shredz [Bot] » Fri Oct 12, 2018 8:12 am

Image


:trump:
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #71 by shredz [Bot] » Fri Oct 12, 2018 8:31 am

Adnan Khashoggi, the Saudi arms dealer (cousin brother of Jamal) was Trump's friend from 80s and sold a yacht to Trump for $29 million which Trump later sold to Prince Talal when he went bankrupt

https://www.vanityfair.com/magazine/1989/09/dunne198909
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #72 by Dog » Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:46 am

I’m starting to think the FBI had Trump years ago and flipped him and set him up to become potus to really drain the swamp.

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #73 by Dog » Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:47 am

Or maybe it was Soros.

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #74 by shredz [Bot] » Fri Oct 12, 2018 6:59 pm

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #75 by shredz [Bot] » Fri Oct 12, 2018 7:25 pm

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #76 by shredz [Bot] » Fri Oct 12, 2018 7:35 pm

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #77 by shredz [Bot] » Fri Oct 12, 2018 7:41 pm

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #78 by PredsFan77 » Fri Oct 12, 2018 7:44 pm

oh shit
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #79 by chicpea » Fri Oct 12, 2018 8:17 pm

Interesting.

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #80 by shredz [Bot] » Fri Oct 12, 2018 9:08 pm

The disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi has shocked many in the United States, but it should not come as a surprise. Indeed, it is a logical outgrowth of the policies that the Saudi leadership has been pursuing for the past two years, and the support that it has found for its approach in the Trump White House and parts of the American establishment.

In April 2016, President Barack Obama was making his final visit to Saudi Arabia. He sat opposite King Salman, a septuagenarian battling illness who tended to sit stoic and staid throughout meetings. Despite the king’s poor health, the two of them went back and forth on various issues, many of which included disagreements—on the Iran nuclear agreement, the counter-isis campaign, Yemen, Syria, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. On several of these issues, Obama counseled the Saudis to pursue dialogue with the Iranians instead of sliding further into the sectarian war that was engulfing the region. Then Obama raised human rights.

The Saudis had recently executed 47 prisoners, including a prominent Shiite sheikh, and imprisoned a high-profile blogger critical of the kingdom. In blunt language, Obama protested these actions, and warned the king that Saudi Arabia’s human-rights record was going to bring greater international isolation, since the United States and Europe wouldn’t defend the Saudis’ actions internationally. The sustainability of the U.S.-Saudi relationship was potentially at stake. I was sitting in a long row of U.S. officials along one side of the room and noticed one of the Saudis opposite me stirring irritably in his seat. It was the deputy crown prince, Mohammad bin Salman—widely known by his initials, MbS.

I sat in hundreds of bilateral meetings during eight years in the White House, and I never saw anything quite like what happened next. Usually, no one speaks except the heads of state, unless they call on an expert to offer a particular view—this is especially true in protocol-conscious places like Saudi Arabia. But even though he was seated about halfway down the row of Saudi officials from the king, MbS stood up and began lecturing Obama. You don’t understand the Saudi justice system, he said. He argued that the Saudi public demanded vengeance against criminals, and those who had been beheaded had to be killed for the sake of stability in the kingdom. He dismissed any concerns about jailed bloggers and journalists. With condescension, he offered to arrange for Obama to get a briefing on Saudi justice.


https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archi ... ip/572905/
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #81 by shredz [Bot] » Sat Oct 13, 2018 9:19 am

This is so weird. Has she said she has the video?







:rollseyes:
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #82 by PredsFan77 » Sat Oct 13, 2018 10:37 am

sure
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #83 by shredz [Bot] » Sat Oct 13, 2018 11:28 am

While she claims to be Khashoggi’s fiancée, his family has denied ever hearing or knowing about her.

This was a Muslim Brotherhood-Qatari operation using the fiancee as a plant. Khashoggi was working on improving Saudi-Turkish relations. Something Qatar and their MB cohorts will not tolerate. This made him expendable and laid the trap to pin this mystery on Saudi Arabia to create a rift between the two nations.

Shortly before, thousands of accounts started concurrently to accept condolences on Khashoggi’s presumable death, and Al-Jazeera Channel quoted correspondent claimed that Khashoggi’s body had been found, and that his burial and funeral would be two days later. It then deleted a tweet and omitted the story which could still be found in other outlets.

In another contradiction, a Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated news website based in London, claimed that Khashoggi had been tortured inside the Saudi consulate.

Moreover, Qatari media alleged that the body the Saudi writer was cut off into pieces and has been charged out of the consulate. Then, the Qatari channel omitted the story.

The Turkish Anadolu News Agency claimed that 15 Saudi employees had arrived at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul while Khashoggi was there, and they left after his death.
After that the agency tweeted in correction: “The Saudi security delegation arrived Sunday at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, days after journalist Jamal Khashoggi disappeared”.
This made one of Khashoggi’s friends upset, a Kuwaiti activist, Mohammed al-Awadi, who apologized for tweeting his condolences.

However, Khashoggi’s other friend, the well-known Brotherhood leader Azzam al-Tamimi, expressed his disappointment regarding the Turkish denial and strongly criticized Erdogan for that.
As many are waking up to the discrepancies in the media; the Qatari media keeps publishing opinion pieces and analyses based on this series of false news.

Let’s assume that this incident occurred as brutally as it was reported in the press; in that case, we will still be avoiding statements which would totally incriminate Saudi Arabia. Of course, a state cannot act beyond the law, otherwise, you don’t call it a state. In this case, we might be dealing with an organization which is acting as a kind of deep state structure by using the means of a state representing its own people. It is necessary to eradicate these elements.
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #84 by chicpea » Sat Oct 13, 2018 11:32 am

Which part is yours and which part is the blog?
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #85 by shredz [Bot] » Sat Oct 13, 2018 11:55 am

I only have one sentence in there, the rest is a mix of Sibel Edmonds and al-Arabiya, Yeni Safak et cetera. That's what they are running with as a defense.

Lots of "lets cut off SA altogether" as an ally talk. It just isn't going to happen anytime soon. Trump is just as in bed with the Saudi's as Bush was. Only he loves them because they purchase his condos. Bing Bing Bing.

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #86 by chicpea » Sat Oct 13, 2018 4:08 pm

shredz wrote:I only have one sentence in there


Well, generally people sort out who said which words. Kind of an unspoken addendum to posting and also libel law.
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #87 by shredz [Bot] » Sat Oct 13, 2018 4:47 pm

chicpea wrote:
shredz wrote:I only have one sentence in there


Well, generally people sort out who said which words. Kind of an unspoken addendum to posting and also libel law.


Yeah, I know. A little lazy on my part but I was just throwing the other side of the coin gist together and was not too concerned with who said what because they are all on the same boat with regards to Khashoggi. I'm not going to be posting that anywhere as my own. It was solely for here.
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #88 by shredz [Bot] » Sat Oct 13, 2018 4:53 pm

How the Secret Service Foiled an Assassination Plot Against Trump by ISIS

A pair of Secret Service agents assigned to protect President Trump open up about the anxieties of their jobs and a pair of credible assassination threats they stopped in Manila.


https://www.thedailybeast.com/how-the-s ... mp-by-isis
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #89 by PredsFan77 » Sat Oct 13, 2018 7:55 pm

wat if this dude was in too deep with this chick and this was the only way he could get away from here
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #90 by shredz [Bot] » Sun Oct 14, 2018 9:04 am

What if shes a man?
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #91 by PredsFan77 » Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:32 am

fair point
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #92 by shredz [Bot] » Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:34 am

Imposing any type of sanctions on Saudi Arabia by the West will cause the kingdom to resort to other options, US President Donald Trump had said a few days ago, and that Russia and China are ready to fulfill Riyadh’s military needs among others. No one can deny that repercussions of these sanctions will include a Russian military base in Tabuk, northwest of Saudi Arabia, in the heated four corners of Syria, Israel, Lebanon and Iraq.

At a time where Hamas and Hezbollah have turned from enemies into friends, getting this close to Russia will lead to a closeness to Iran and maybe even a reconciliation with it.


:donger: :donger:

US sanctions on Riyadh would mean Washington is stabbing itself
https://english.alarabiya.net/en/views/ ... tself.html
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #93 by shredz [Bot] » Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:50 am

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Re: The Middle Africa Thread

Post #94 by AD » Sun Oct 14, 2018 6:21 pm

That was moronic.
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #95 by PredsFan77 » Sun Oct 14, 2018 8:00 pm

what was it
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #96 by shredz [Bot] » Sun Oct 14, 2018 8:21 pm

I dont recall.
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #97 by PredsFan77 » Sun Oct 14, 2018 9:38 pm

couldnt have been thatgood then
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #98 by shredz [Bot] » Sun Oct 14, 2018 9:51 pm

It was his wife is a man, I think with side by side "analysis" - the Saudis are going hardcore at US and Canada when it comes to this and any criticism. .Khashoggi could have had a hit piece in the works but him going to the consulate in Turkey is a little odd when hes in self proclaimed exile in Virginia.

Saudis have beheaded a female activist and killed a mild critic of MbS with no response as to why they did it - just deflections and rally around the flag shit how can one be surprised when Kim Jong Un meets with Trump after killing an American and having his relative killed with a nerve agent on foreign soil.
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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #99 by shredz [Bot] » Mon Oct 15, 2018 5:53 am

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Re: The Middle East-North Africa Thread

Post #100 by shredz [Bot] » Mon Oct 15, 2018 6:10 am

Die Welt interviewed the German-Egyptian political scientist Asiem El Difraoui, co-founder of the Berlin think tank Candid Foundation, who met Khashoggi for the first time during the American occupation of Iraq. Here is a translation of the nub of the interview

Die Welt: Mr El Difraoui, you have met Jamal Khashoggi several times. What kind of person was he?
Asiem El Difraoui: I met him in about 2003 or 2004, in the circle of former Saudi Arabia intelligence chief Turki Bin Faisal Al Saud. He and Prince Turki were already considering how the kingdom could be modernized. And Jamal had met Osama bin Laden several times. He had tried during the 1990s to move him away from militancy. That was obviously important why he visited bin Laden in Sudan and Afghanistan. He told bin Laden that he should mitigate his criticism of the royal family and return home. Of course, within the elite everyone knows each other. Both came from the same generation and from two of the richest families in the kingdom - bin Laden's father was the country's largest contractor, Khashoggi's uncle Adnan was an influential arms dealer. In addition, Khashoggi's grandfather was personal physician to the Saudi King Abd al-Aziz. But Khashoggi himself also had sympathy for the Muslim Brotherhood, in which he saw a more modern, more democratic form of Islamism. For today's Saudi leadership, however, the Muslim Brothers are their principal enemy in the world.

Die Welt: What do you suspect, what could have happened to Khashoggi?

Difraoui: If he was murdered, then I would be surprised if his journalistic activities were the only reason. The Saudis own half of the international Arab media. They have generally built up a very effective media shield. As a journalist and activist, Khashoggi may have been extremely annoying, but no real threat. But Khashoggi knew a lot. He was not just the media officer of intelligence chief Prince Turki. He was one of his main advisers and was said to have worked for the secret service for a while. Khashoggi was extremely familiar with sensitive issues of the kingdom. And he was a member of the super-elite. He might have known too much.

Die Welt: What sort of knowledge could have become dangerous for him?

Difraoui: Corruption or past knowledge about links to extremism. Above all, however, the internal conflicts or misconduct of the royal family. If the secret service protects the security of the country, it must also know what is happening in the ruling family. The current, often unpredictable crown prince Mohammed bin Salman is currently the really strong man in the country. But he has also made enemies in the family. What if his father Salman dies? Then Mohammed will probably have to fight for his position once again. Perhaps Khashoggi's knowledge was dangerous in this regard. His old patron, Prince Turki, wanted to position himself as Crown Prince. He has surprisingly not commented on the case so far. Turki knows almost all internals of the family.


https://www.welt.de/politik/ausland/art ... ismus.html

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