Remembering the worst of the shittiest era in rock music history: the early 2000s

Jackson Pollock's semen.
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Re: Remembering the worst of the shittiest era in rock music history: the early 2000s

Post #51 by Retarder S » Thu Oct 27, 2016 4:04 am

It gave us one of the greatest songs ever written :danson:
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Re: Remembering the worst of the shittiest era in rock music history: the early 2000s

Post #52 by PredsFan77 » Thu Oct 27, 2016 10:00 am

And no one would ever know what a great Zeppelin cover band they are
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Re: Remembering the worst of the shittiest era in rock music history: the early 2000s

Post #53 by Jedrik » Mon Oct 31, 2016 10:24 pm

Germz wrote:
Jedrik wrote:Late 90s/early 00s were terrible if you we're a lazy listener (which I very much was) and relied on what music reached you rather than digging around. Looking back, a lot of stuff I consider essential to me personally appeared around that time but I didn't listen to until much later. e.g. Wilco's Yankee Hotel Foxtrot was '02 but I probably didn't hear it til '07. Modest Mouse and Spoon arrived around then but I encountered them much more recently than that.

Seems like the indie scene began flourishing around that time.

I think we're pretty much saying the same thing. I just should have put the word 'mainstream' in my thread title.

Basically the same argument could be made for the alternative and underground punk scenes of the late 80s. They were the 'indie' of that era, and producing much better rock than the majority of mainstream rock at the time. R.E.M. is pretty much the textbook example. They had already released six albums by the time Losing my Religion broke in 1991, the same year as Nevermind and Ten. And any self-respecting R.E.M. fan will tell you that Out of Time, good as it was, was their worst album to date (with the possible exception of Green). Pretty much the same narrative you'll get about some of the indie bands that broke in 2003-04 and helped to give us the glory years of 2003-07. These were the best years in mainstream rock since 1991-94.

You also saw the same accusations of bandwagon-hopping leveled against perfectly decent bands like The Killers who hopped onto the trendy sound at the right time, but glossed it up with studio production and more importantly, hadn't put in the years in the trenches. Pearl Jam got some flak for this from some alternative snobs and scenesters, but the more egregrious example was STP's first record.


Yeah, I did gather that you meant pop rock/mainstream. Was just it rolling over a bit, what sorts of things were going on in the industry and what it was like to be a consumer of music.

A lot of stuff we take for granted now was still up in the air, landscape was changing, etc. CDs were still around and like $25, Napster was in full swing, Lars Ulrich was in televised court trying to explain to the public how he's being robbed using confusing analogies about ham sandwiches. If you were a band looking to crack the roster at a major label and break onto the big scene by the traditional route, not only were you faced with the usual obstacles, but there was also no guarantee that your music wasn't going to be available for free when all's said and done, anyway.

But the flip side of that is a band buried down a major label's roster might very well have no more exposure than some no-name band with a MySpace page.

Long story short, and I obviously I have no way to back this thesis, but I wonder how many bands just decided, fuck it -- they could accept a middle class life as long as it was steady work, they could do their own thing essentially and they got ongoing support from their indie label, and so the mainstream suffered and just got that much more vaccuous as a result. That, plus the fact that suddenly now there are alternative ways to DIY your exposure and get music out there...I think it was a mutual break up between the big dream aspirations and a lot of these bands that went on to have success with indie labels (Sub Pop, Merge and Matador are three labels I'm thinking of that've been around a while and had good track records of turning up good bands and sustaining them).

Of course part of this is the stubborn belief that any of my favourite indie acts could write a hit song if they felt like it but just don't give a fuck :colbert:
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Re: Remembering the worst of the shittiest era in rock music history: the early 2000s

Post #54 by Jedrik » Mon Oct 31, 2016 10:26 pm

Jedrik wrote:
Germz wrote:
Jedrik wrote:Late 90s/early 00s were terrible if you we're a lazy listener (which I very much was) and relied on what music reached you rather than digging around. Looking back, a lot of stuff I consider essential to me personally appeared around that time but I didn't listen to until much later. e.g. Wilco's Yankee Hotel Foxtrot was '02 but I probably didn't hear it til '07. Modest Mouse and Spoon arrived around then but I encountered them much more recently than that.

Seems like the indie scene began flourishing around that time.

I think we're pretty much saying the same thing. I just should have put the word 'mainstream' in my thread title.

Basically the same argument could be made for the alternative and underground punk scenes of the late 80s. They were the 'indie' of that era, and producing much better rock than the majority of mainstream rock at the time. R.E.M. is pretty much the textbook example. They had already released six albums by the time Losing my Religion broke in 1991, the same year as Nevermind and Ten. And any self-respecting R.E.M. fan will tell you that Out of Time, good as it was, was their worst album to date (with the possible exception of Green). Pretty much the same narrative you'll get about some of the indie bands that broke in 2003-04 and helped to give us the glory years of 2003-07. These were the best years in mainstream rock since 1991-94.

You also saw the same accusations of bandwagon-hopping leveled against perfectly decent bands like The Killers who hopped onto the trendy sound at the right time, but glossed it up with studio production and more importantly, hadn't put in the years in the trenches. Pearl Jam got some flak for this from some alternative snobs and scenesters, but the more egregrious example was STP's first record.


Yeah, I did gather that you meant pop rock/mainstream. Was just it rolling over a bit, what sorts of things were going on in the industry and what it was like to be a consumer of music around 2000.

A lot of stuff we take for granted now was still up in the air, landscape was changing, etc. CDs were still around and like $25, Napster was in full swing, Lars Ulrich was in televised court trying to explain to the public how he's being robbed using confusing analogies about ham sandwiches. If you were a band looking to crack the roster at a major label and break onto the big scene by the traditional route, not only were you faced with the usual obstacles, but there was also no guarantee that your music wasn't going to be available for free when all's said and done, anyway.

But the flip side of that is a band buried down a major label's roster might very well have no more exposure than some no-name band with a MySpace page.

Long story short, and I obviously I have no way to back this thesis, but I wonder how many bands just decided, fuck it -- they could accept a middle class life as long as it was steady work, they could do their own thing essentially and they got ongoing support from their indie label, and so the mainstream suffered and just got that much more vaccuous as a result. That, plus the fact that suddenly now there are alternative ways to DIY your exposure and get music out there...I think it was a mutual break up between the big dream aspirations and a lot of these bands that went on to have success with indie labels (Sub Pop, Merge and Matador are three labels I'm thinking of that've been around a while and had good track records of turning up good bands and sustaining them).

Of course part of this is the stubborn belief that any of my favourite indie acts could write a hit song if they felt like it but just don't give a fuck :colbert:
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Re: Remembering the worst of the shittiest era in rock music history: the early 2000s

Post #55 by Germz » Mon Oct 31, 2016 11:14 pm

Jedrik wrote:Of course part of this is the stubborn belief that any of my favourite indie acts could write a hit song if they felt like it but just don't give a fuck :colbert:


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Re: Remembering the worst of the shittiest era in rock music history: the early 2000s

Post #56 by PredsFan77 » Sun May 21, 2017 12:04 pm

http://www.vulture.com/2017/05/the-stro ... story.html

The Last Moment OF THE Last Great Rock Band
The inside story of how the Strokes — and the early-aughts New York rock boom — went bust, told by the people who lived it.
INTERVIEWS BY LIZZY GOODMAN
Photographs by Colin Lane


Albert Hammond Jr.: I remember Julian threatening to beat Ryan [Adams] up if he hung out with me, as a protective thing. He’d heard that Ryan would come and give me heroin, so he was just like, “If you come to my apartment again with heroin, I’m going to kick your ass.” I hadn’t really been doing it in baggie form until Ryan showed up. He was definitely a bad influence.
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Re: Remembering the worst of the shittiest era in rock music history: the early 2000s

Post #57 by PredsFan77 » Thu Sep 21, 2017 6:45 pm

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Re: Remembering the worst of the shittiest era in rock music history: the early 2000s

Post #58 by clawfirst » Thu Sep 21, 2017 6:52 pm

PredsFan77 wrote:And no one would ever know what a great Zeppelin cover band they are

I know it isnt the right thread but god damn these kids are stealing in all the right ways


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