Chicago

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Re: Chicago

Post #51 by Boring Choice #2 » Sat Aug 05, 2017 8:25 pm

Dr_Chimera wrote:
Dog wrote:Too bad baseball is so boring.


Image


Great example of something as boring as baseball. Knew we could count on the good doctor to come up with something.
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Re: Chicago

Post #52 by Dog » Sun Aug 06, 2017 1:01 am

Hamilton was very good. It's deserving of the hype and that's quite surprising. You do have to switch your mind off to swallow the overly romantic view of the revolution, but as far as these things go, it was relatively mild and the second act (post revolution) was almost entirely devoid of it and, in good part because of it, was I found considerably better than the first act.

The good stuff: the writing is excellent. Quite witty, funny and, as far as these things go, substantive. can't really ask for more. The music and choreography matches the level of the writing. It's very well done. High points: Jefferson pimp like in dress and personality. Policy debates as rap slamdowns in front of cabinet between Jefferson and Burr/Hamilton. King Georges' solos. A Washington full of gravitas but relatively ineffective. Good credit given to France for its pivotal role in the revolution. Despite what I wrote earlier, these type of shows run on gross romanizations and oversimplification and, albeit it does so to an extent, it does so far less than most other shows of this nature. The rivalry (mainly as a matter of personality) between Burr and Hamilton running throughout was also superb. It was quite top quality for this sort of show.
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Re: Chicago

Post #53 by Dog » Sun Aug 06, 2017 2:12 am

King George bits:

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Re: Chicago

Post #54 by AD » Sun Aug 06, 2017 8:44 pm

Doc was right, then.
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Re: Chicago

Post #55 by Dr_Chimera » Sun Aug 06, 2017 9:27 pm

A noble spirit embiggens the smallest man.
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Re: Chicago

Post #56 by Dog » Mon Aug 07, 2017 12:07 am

Dr_Chimera wrote:A noble spirit embiggens the smallest man.


Ah, but the angry mind is a narrow mind, my friend.
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Re: Chicago

Post #57 by Dog » Mon Aug 07, 2017 1:33 am

By the way, Dr C, I also thought it would be a fluff piece on diversity and wasn't planning on going to see it. Preferred to go to the Steppenwolf, catch Debussy's La Mer at Harris Theatre and catch a game at Wrigley. However, over dinner with colleagues a couples days ago somebody (seemingly trustworthy on the matter) said it was very good. So I took the cue and gave it a try. Turns out, it was very good!
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Re: Chicago

Post #58 by Dog » Mon Aug 07, 2017 1:38 am

Lastly, spent the day at the Art Institute today. That also didn't disappoint. Great collection of impressionist and modern paintings. Millenium park is also a great walk. Best meal I had might have been at the Purple Pig, but I didn't go out of my way to find places to eat. Overall, I really liked Chicago.
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Re: Chicago

Post #59 by PredsFan77 » Mon Aug 07, 2017 8:24 am

And didn't get murdered either!
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Re: Chicago

Post #60 by Dog » Mon Aug 07, 2017 9:30 am

PredsFan77 wrote:And didn't get murdered either!


It's remarkable how clean and yuppie and artsy Chicago is considering the murder rate. US cities do such a remarkable job at segregating by socio-economics!
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Re: Chicago

Post #61 by Dr_Chimera » Mon Aug 07, 2017 3:50 pm

Dog thought that Hamilton, a musical featuring black people playing slave owners, while never actually mentioning slavery, would be "a fluff piece on diversity."
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Re: Chicago

Post #62 by Dr_Chimera » Mon Aug 07, 2017 3:52 pm

Dog wrote:
Dr_Chimera wrote:A noble spirit embiggens the smallest man.


Ah, but the angry mind is a narrow mind, my friend.


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1754264/quotes
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Re: Chicago

Post #63 by Dog » Mon Aug 07, 2017 3:59 pm

That's right, bitch. Never back down, the beatdown. Would probably make for a good musical.
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Re: Chicago

Post #64 by Dog » Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:09 pm

Dr_Chimera wrote:Dog thought that Hamilton, a musical featuring black people playing slave owners, while never actually mentioning slavery, would be "a fluff piece on diversity."


It mentions opposition to slavery once in a while, one of the more cringe worthy aspects of it. The diversity fluff piece comes from "actualizing" the revolutionary/founding fathers story/myths by using a cast of mixed ethnical composition. The show's primary message, from the type of music to the cast, is that of an America that is at its core ethnically diverse and better for it -which is an impossible pill to swallow, particularly in the context of the revolutionary period. It attempts to write "diversity" into the core of the nation's founding story. The freaking thing says the word "immigrant" in glorified context about 1,700 times.

The thing is, once you get off your soap box and put it in its genre, it's a really well written, well choreographed and engaging piece of entertainment. That's what I'm getting at. It's a really good show, once one gets over one's self.

The nice irony, I found, was that Hamilton's personality as portrayed (an unpolished, aggresive, no holds barred go getter that never backs down and is consumed with social status) reminds one of Trump more than anything else. I'd think originalists and core conservatives would have found alot in this story which matches up with their beliefs, even if they added a thick layer of "liberal fluff" with the ethnic diverse cast and musical style.
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Re: Chicago

Post #65 by Dog » Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:22 pm

By the way, do you think Rigoletto (or any opera for that matter) is profound? The story lines tend towards the insufferably frivolus and cringe worthy. But I take it you enjoy opera for the music and show worthiness of the scenes and performances.
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Re: Chicago

Post #66 by AD » Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:24 pm

Go to more German operas.
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Re: Chicago

Post #67 by Dog » Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:27 pm

Of course, banana would be a fan of Wagner.
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Re: Chicago

Post #68 by Dog » Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:31 pm

I don't like Mozart generally. It's like a really nice thing, perfectly engineered. Layers and layers of complexity mixing into what is essentially a "nice tune". It's the epitome of the Classical period. Well made, but not conveying the emotional depth of earlier or later works. Mozart kinda sucks, I find.
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Re: Chicago

Post #69 by AD » Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:36 pm

I don't know what to say. I like most of the romantic era central Europeans and am now judging you for your tastes.


I'm a bit of a music whore though. There isn't much I don't like.
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Re: Chicago

Post #70 by Dog » Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:45 pm

AD wrote:I don't know what to say. I like most of the romantic era central Europeans and am now judging you for your tastes.


I'm a bit of a music whore though. There isn't much I don't like.


You were totally into Backstreet Boys in high school. Totally.
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Re: Chicago

Post #71 by Dog » Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:49 pm

You're also a total Beethoven whore, I'm sure. With all the fury and conquest and the dadadada.

Contrary to Mozart, though, Beethoven has tremendous depth. I won't judge you for it.
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Re: Chicago

Post #72 by AD » Mon Aug 07, 2017 7:45 pm

I like both but in a bind I'll choose Mozart. I prefer the late 19th century russians. But its almost unfair to compare those different era.

I liked New Kids, Backstreet Boys and the Spice Girls.

Edit: N'sync can go fuck themselves.
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Re: Chicago

Post #73 by PredsFan77 » Mon Aug 07, 2017 8:42 pm

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Re: Chicago

Post #74 by vonbonds » Tue Aug 08, 2017 6:53 am

AD wrote:I like both but in a bind I'll choose Mozart. I prefer the late 19th century russians. But its almost unfair to compare those different era.

I liked New Kids, Backstreet Boys and the Spice Girls.

Edit: N'sync can go fuck themselves.

Where is Bach on your list? Hopefully on top pissing his excellence on everyone below him
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Re: Chicago

Post #75 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 9:29 am

Bach is good, I especially like the Brandenburg concertos. Most baroque music, given its religious foundation, has interesting depth. I also like earlier composers like Monteverdi and Vivaldi (4 seasons is so overplayed, but brilliant). Then, like I mentionned for Mozart, I'm not a huge fan of the Classical period. In the period, I tend to prefer Haydn to Mozart. Don't ask me why. It's not that I dislike Mozart, it's just too perfect I find. Comes out sounding "cute" to me. Not everthing. His requiem is amongst my favorite pieces. Then Beethoven is fantastic and alot of the other romantics, I especially like Mendelssohn. Overall, though, many of my favorite composers tend to be more modern, my favorite likely being Britten, but also Dvorak, Mahler and even Tchaikovski (he's very obvious in his music, but it still gets me going -stuff like the 1812 overture and his 5th symphony is fantastic). I also like Schoenberg and music heading into contemporary atonal music. I still have a bit of a hard time with contemporary classical music, but can appreciate stuff like Penderecki when the mood is right. You have to be awake and ready for it.

I've only discovered classical music in the past 5 years or so, prior to that I never really appreciated any music. Being a bit intense by nature in what I get interested in, I read a few books and really started appreciating. Have a subscription to the Montreal symphony for 3 years now and try to catch concerts when I travel. I'm no where near an expert, but I do appreciate it greatly and know enough of the basics to get around. One thing that I find disconcerting is how gray haired the audiences are. The average age at a concert must be 120 years old. Couple of hipsters, couple geeks, couple businessmen and the rest gets bussed in from the geriatrics institute. I find it disconcerting. The music has so much to offer, but there is a learning curve that acts as a barrier to entry I think. Like most things, you have to train yourself a bit to get the most out of it. I think learning to enjoy the subtitlies and nuances in a 45 minute symphony or 30 minute concerto (not to mention keeping your attention up) is a great counterweight to the modern adhd speed of things. Connects you back to something unhurried that has quality, depth and detail.

I haven't had the same success with opera. Read a bit (less), listened to a few but it's not as natural for me as classical music. I have a very hard time getting over the frivolous nature of the stories. Have to constantly stop my eyes from rolling up. I've had better time listening to opera than seeing it. My daughter loves ballet. Started with the nutcracker which we've made a bit of a tradition since she was 3 and she's loved it and asks for it since. She's seen a few others (she's even watched by herself on YouTube). I actually prefer it to opera. She's 7 now, so i'll be adding a few extra shows with her starting this year.

In short, I'm becoming a poof.
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Re: Chicago

Post #76 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 9:30 am

Holy fuck, I never think I'm writing very long on my phone, then I post it and I'm like "holy shit, that's long. How embarrassing". Oh well.
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Re: Chicago

Post #77 by Boring Choice #2 » Tue Aug 08, 2017 9:57 am

big surprise that your daughter likes the nutcracker. i feel sorry for the poor slob whose nuts she'll end up cracking. he'll never know what was coming until it's too late.
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Re: Chicago

Post #78 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 10:04 am

It will be his own fault. Should have been able to see it coming a mile away.
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Re: Chicago

Post #79 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 10:13 am

Hey D, does my daughter sound like your son? I suspect it's similar. Pretty smart, but with self regulation issues. How/when did you decide to have him evaluated?
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Re: Chicago

Post #80 by AD » Tue Aug 08, 2017 11:07 am

In his genre, Back is good. Easy to play too! (I played a lot of Bach).

But I find it a bit robotic if you want to just listen and enjoy.
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Re: Chicago

Post #81 by Boring Choice #2 » Tue Aug 08, 2017 12:12 pm

Dog wrote:Hey D, does my daughter sound like your son? I suspect it's similar. Pretty smart, but with self regulation issues. How/when did you decide to have him evaluated?


my son's day:
my son wakes up (pre-pill) full of energy and raring to go. it's at this time that he is most bothersome to his sister and is often very loud. he is usually up by 6:30 am, even on weekends.
he gets his pill with breakfast and it starts to kick in within an hour or so. he's still annoying and still has focus issues, but it is better and he's a bit calmer.
the pills usually start wearing out in the late afternoon (i.e. when he's getting home from school usually) and he starts to become less and less manageable as the day goes on.
we had some issues with temper around supper time (just in time for me to see it when i got home from work), but we've since taken him back to the doctor and are in the process of determining the best set of medication for him.
in the evening, he takes forever to get going to bed (a combination of distraction and lack of will), between washing up, getting dressed, brushing teeth, etc.
then when he's finally in bed and my wife are ready to relax, he often pops up out of bed with a comment/question/general distraction as his body is still full of energy and he isn't ready to sleep yet.
he usually falls asleep about an hour after we put him in the bed for the evening.


similarities with your daughter:
smart
self-regulation (though i'd say my son is probably more impulsive to the extent we worry he'll put himself/other in danger sometimes)
controlling/argumentative (though i think my son is less stubborn about things, and usually just tries to argue / negotiate his way into getting his way)
full of questions

differences:
i'd say the biggest difference is that my son appears to be more of a ball of energy that flies in, does things for a very brief period of time and moves on leaving a mess in his wake and never ("never") stops talking
your daughter appears to be more thought focused and searching for answers.
my son seems to be satisfied with getting any response and moving on to the next thought, even if he doesn't get the answer he necessarily wanted, just as long as someone responds to him.


we took our son to the doctor the first time around grade 2, when the teacher indicated that it was interfering with his school work (really more was that she couldn't handle the questions/energy, i think) and that she felt his hand-writing was below average. i think we started him on meds in grade three, and the teacher supplemented that with some concentration aides (putting him on his own near her desk, giving him a timer for his work so that he could move on regularly). last year (grade 4) was a little bit of a back slide in that the meds might have been less effective and when we increased his dosage, he started having temper issues in the afternoon. it also didn't help that he had three teachers over the course of any given day. we're working on things to set him up to succeed next school year. i'm hoping the school administration makes an environment in which he can do better, but either way, he's going to have to cope on his own anyway.

so, long-story short. the point at which you should consider taking your daughter is the point at which her issues start to have an impact on her ability to learn and deal with other kids.
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Re: Chicago

Post #82 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 1:21 pm

Thank you, D. That is very helpful actually and I think you've qualified the differences and similarities right. She's not such a "ball of energy", albeit she is full of energy and fidgety (has trouble staying put without shacking a leg, turning around, etc). She does "disconnect" quite often and starts acting super silly, this is mostly conncted with being tired. It's also tied into wanting stimulation I think. When she starts going crazy, we can usually propose an activity to her and she'll get right into it calmly if interested. The real problem is with getting her to do school work (or anything else, really) when she doesn't feel like it. She is very difficult to get to do something she doesn't feel like doing and will be very oppositional and is prone to explode. She's controlling (extremely) and short tempered. Generally, though, when not contradicted, she is super sweet, positive, inquisitive and enthousiastic. Her biggest issue is probably frustration control / following direction.

She's had no issues in school so far. She has that lexical access difficulty, which is real and impeding in oral presentations, but her school does so many of them that she's actually improved significantly in just a year. Otherwise, she's doig very well. Teachers have reported distractability, but that tends to be in the beginning of the year (both KD and 1st grade) but I think that's linked to being nervous as it disappears after the first month or so. We've directly asked teachers about attention issues, they say it's possible but she's doing well so far. She can space out mostly or join in with other kids goofing around (she's not super serious, she likes fun a little too much ;)). So far, the "problems" haven't been at school, it's been at home and mostly in a confrontational setting when trying to get her to do things. She's always been meltdown prone. In daycare, she'd act perfectly during the day but litterally have a 45 minutes huge crying meltdown when she got home. That makes me think keeping it together during the day overtaxed her and she just blew up when she let go after getting home.

We've taken her to a child psychologist when she was 4. It was during an uncontrollable tantrum period. It was 6 sessions. During one session, the psychologist voluntarily frustrated her during a game to provoke her. My daughter got up, walked out, went to see my wife in the waitingn room and told her "i've had enough of this, we're going" and walked down and stood there with arms crossed. She was 4. The psych's evaluation was that add was possible but too young to tell (didn't do the actual tests), that she found her very intelligent (she shared existential type reflexions that were unusual for her age and built complex games/rules) but was also extraordinarily controlling. Take away was to leave her plenty of space but be very specify and consistent on boundaries. That's what we've always done. Basically, the sessions gave us nothing.

She's now 7 and has had a doozy of a time the past months. It feels like she's a teen. Moody, short tempered and dismissive of us. Wants to do own thing. I believe ahe's thinking of getting her own appartment soon. At the same time, when in a good mood, she's still the same. It's gotten better the past week or two. Again I think the school year taxed her ressources and she needed a few months towards the end of the year and begining of vacation to cool down. That's what has me worried, this overtaxing of the system by stimulous.

Mostly because of her opposition and fighting, my wife is again talking about consulting a child psych. I'm not much in favour. Told her you only get so many of these things before the kid starts thinking somethig is wrong (even if you wrap it up, kids are smart and they'll know). I'm more inclined to think that talk without diagnosis leads to not much. If we do anything, I'd do an evaluation and that way we can have more clarity instead of constantly guessing. At the end of the day, I get the feeling this can turn out great if she gets it all together. Positive, enthousiastic child, with a tough personality and smarts. It can also go all wrong when she hits the teen years if she rebels with her oppositional streaks and love for fun and adventures.
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Re: Chicago

Post #83 by AD » Tue Aug 08, 2017 1:28 pm

This is the worst Chicago thread ever.
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Re: Chicago

Post #84 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 1:33 pm

The what thread, now?
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Re: Chicago

Post #85 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 1:35 pm

How are your kids btw, AD? They weird too?
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Re: Chicago

Post #86 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 1:55 pm

How about your daughter, D? The officially gifted one. She has issues?
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Re: Chicago

Post #87 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 2:01 pm

I actually read that "gifted" kids can have what they call "overexcitabilities". Basically, they take in alot of stimulous and that wears them out. They can also be very oppositional and don't follow "just becauses". Also tend to run on a motor and be very active. Can be similar to adhd or even have adhd as well. I don't know how much bullshit that is, though. My daughter isn't a whizz at school. She does quite well, but my wife has seen plenty that are quicker catches and/or more advanced. It's more her own personal reflections that give you some pause. Your daughter has any of this?
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Re: Chicago

Post #88 by AD » Tue Aug 08, 2017 2:54 pm

Dog wrote:How are your kids btw, AD? They weird too?


My 2nd is pretty normal I feel. Very smart. Great sense of observation (notices details like your daughter, somewhat headstrong too.. but can go back to "reasonable" pretty quick). He's like your daughter-light. He's 3 though so there's room for me to screw him up.

My 1st is a bit of a mess. Smart. Especially when it comes to creative/artistic side. He's also a pretty good reader (for his age). But really comes to life if you give him anything that can make music or to draw with or sing or dance. But he has these dark mood swings. Very negative. Loses hope in a situation very quickly. He's like an angsty-emotional 14 year old.
Except he's 6.
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Re: Chicago

Post #89 by AD » Tue Aug 08, 2017 2:57 pm

Like I fully expect him to dye his hair purple and lock himself in his room blasting My Chemical Romance* soon.



*Or whatever will exist by the time he gets to his early teens
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Re: Chicago

Post #90 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 3:04 pm

That would be so cool!
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Re: Chicago

Post #91 by AD » Tue Aug 08, 2017 3:06 pm

Yeah. I have to make sure his group of friends is not going to be the "do drugs and slice your wrists" types though...
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Re: Chicago

Post #92 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 3:13 pm

Start policing now. I so want to turn my daughter into a geek. I'm thinking of getting her braces and thick glasses. She's so active and eats so reasonably that I can't really fatten her up.

:(
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Re: Chicago

Post #93 by AD » Tue Aug 08, 2017 3:23 pm

How do I make him see the lighter happier side of life?

(you know.. considering the world is a flaming hell hole well on its way to a fiery cataclysm probably within our lifetimes)
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Re: Chicago

Post #94 by Boring Choice #2 » Tue Aug 08, 2017 3:30 pm

Dog wrote:How about your daughter, D? The officially gifted one. She has issues?


She has / had some issues, but nothing regarding attention, etc. If anything, she's hyper-focused and that is the reason she did well on the test* that got her accepted in the gifted program. Essentially, if you are smart, well-read and can focus well, you should do well on the test.

When the school contacted us to talk about how our daughter did well on the test (3 kids in their grade 4 level met the top 1% of the province category), our first reactions were: (i) yeah, we know she's smart and can pay attention -- big deal; followed by (ii) oh fuck, how do we explain this to our son that she's going to get this opportunity because she did well on the test without him flipping out; and finally with (iii) please don't let him have done poorly. please don't let him have done poorly.

If we didn't have twins, it wouldn't have been a big deal either way. But because they are the same age and in the same class, the automatic comparisons happen. We try very hard to make sure that my son realizes that just because his sister is a smart, focused, mostly well-adjusted girl, it doesn't mean that he is stupid or mean or bad in any way. We were relieved that he did very well on the test and that his attention deficiency didn't have that much of an impact.


*School Board info on test:
http://www.tvdsb.ca/programs.cfm?subpage=3108
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Re: Chicago

Post #95 by Boring Choice #2 » Tue Aug 08, 2017 3:34 pm

Dog wrote:I actually read that "gifted" kids can have what they call "overexcitabilities". Basically, they take in alot of stimulous and that wears them out. They can also be very oppositional and don't follow "just becauses". Also tend to run on a motor and be very active. Can be similar to adhd or even have adhd as well. I don't know how much bullshit that is, though. My daughter isn't a whizz at school. She does quite well, but my wife has seen plenty that are quicker catches and/or more advanced. It's more her own personal reflections that give you some pause. Your daughter has any of this?


my daughter has the advantage of not only being intelligent, but being inherently lazy. even though she's smart and can do well, she doesn't try very hard and gets by with regular smart kid marks. at some point it will impact her. but i think for now, she's fine.

she does however catch on to things (especially math) quickly. she just understands why things work the way they do. my son learns by asking and figuring things out. she doesn't usually need to ask to understand, once she reads something.
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Re: Chicago

Post #96 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 3:38 pm

Have you found the program worthwhile? I'd take your kid's relative results with a grain of salt (as I'm sure you do) as, as you've said, a child's focus and "seriousness" has outweighed effects, especially in grade school (ie. calm/focussed kids do especially well at that level). Your son can very much do "better" in the long run. Make sure she knows this. Use this sibling rivalry to fuel results.
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Re: Chicago

Post #97 by AD » Tue Aug 08, 2017 3:41 pm

Boring Choice #2 wrote:my daughter has the advantage of not only being intelligent, but being inherently lazy. even though she's smart and can do well, she doesn't try very hard and gets by with regular smart kid marks. at some point it will impact her. but i think for now, she's fine.


Fantastic. Some day, she too can grow up to be a reasonably successful middling professional that spends her time discussing basement leaks and vacation plans on an obscure sports board.
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Re: Chicago

Post #98 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 3:42 pm

Boring Choice #2 wrote:
Dog wrote:I actually read that "gifted" kids can have what they call "overexcitabilities". Basically, they take in alot of stimulous and that wears them out. They can also be very oppositional and don't follow "just becauses". Also tend to run on a motor and be very active. Can be similar to adhd or even have adhd as well. I don't know how much bullshit that is, though. My daughter isn't a whizz at school. She does quite well, but my wife has seen plenty that are quicker catches and/or more advanced. It's more her own personal reflections that give you some pause. Your daughter has any of this?


my daughter has the advantage of not only being intelligent, but being inherently lazy. even though she's smart and can do well, she doesn't try very hard and gets by with regular smart kid marks. at some point it will impact her. but i think for now, she's fine.

she does however catch on to things (especially math) quickly. she just understands why things work the way they do. my son learns by asking and figuring things out. she doesn't usually need to ask to understand, once she reads something.


Yeah, mine's quite similar on that. The 2nd grade teacher (the one she is getting this year) -a very blunt and experienced teacher- has already remarked to my wife that my daughter does the bare minimum to get by (while her inexperienced first grade teacher was praising my daughter for stuff that I knew was meh). I'm looking forward to this year actually. Teacher is tough and experienced. So far she's had two inexperienced teachers whose feedback was "fluffy". My daughter may be in for a rude awakening this year. :)
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Re: Chicago

Post #99 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 3:52 pm

AD wrote:How do I make him see the lighter happier side of life?

(you know.. considering the world is a flaming hell hole well on its way to a fiery cataclysm probably within our lifetimes)


Honestly, it's mostly useless. Large genetical component to that. Anywho, yolo!
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Re: Chicago

Post #100 by Dog » Tue Aug 08, 2017 4:00 pm

Dog wrote:
AD wrote:How do I make him see the lighter happier side of life?

(you know.. considering the world is a flaming hell hole well on its way to a fiery cataclysm probably within our lifetimes)


Honestly, it's mostly useless. Large genetical component to that. Anywho, yolo!


I think the correct answer for moving the non genetic / non circumstance driven 30-40% variable on that is to get him to be mindful and grateful and get him engaged in stuff that he likes.

(Aka, tell him that if he wasn't alive in this cold, meaningless world, he wouldn't have the existantial doom and gloom that his soul craves)

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